mast

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Related to Masts: mizzen, sail, spar

nail (one's) colors to the mast

To refuse to cease or surrender. Because lowering a ship's flag was a customary indication of surrender, this nautical phrase emphasizes the resolve of a ship's crew. We will nail our colors to the mast and fight on—they will never capture us! We're going to have a tough time beating this team now that they are playing with such determination. I fear they've nailed their colors to the mast.
See also: color, mast, nail

at half-mast

Partially raised or lowered. The phrase most often describes a flag that has been lowered to honor a recently-deceased person. After our former president died, flags were at half-mast all across the country. My daughter came home from the park covered in dirt, her ponytail at half-mast.

be at half-mast

To be partially raised or lowered. The phrase most often describes a flag that has been lowered to honor a recently-deceased person. After our former president died, flags were at half-mast all across the country. When my daughter came home from the park, she was covered in dirt, and her ponytail was at half-mast.

nail (one's) colours to the mast

To refuse to cease or surrender. Because lowering a ship's flag was a customary indication of surrender, this nautical phrase emphasizes the resolve of a ship's crew. We will nail our colours to the mast and fight on—they will never capture us! We're going to have a tough time beating this team now that they are playing with such determination. I fear they've nailed their colours to the mast.
See also: colour, mast, nail

at half-mast

 and at half-staff
[of a flag] halfway up or down its flagpole. The flag was flying at half-mast because the general had died. Americans fly flags at half-staff on Memorial Day.

at half-mast

Halfway up or down, as in The church bells tolled off and on all day and the flags were at half-mast. This term refers to placing a flag halfway up a ship's mast or flagpole, a practice used as a mark of respect for a person who has died or, at sea, as a distress signal. Occasionally the term is transferred to other objects, as in Tom's pants were at half-mast as he raced around the playground, or The puppy's tail was at half-mast. [First half of 1600s]

nail your colours to the mast

BRITISH, JOURNALISM
1. If you nail your colours to the mast, you state your opinions or beliefs about something clearly and publicly. Note: A ship's colours are its national flag. Let me nail my colours to the mast straightaway. I both like and admire him immensely.
2. If you nail your colours to the mast, you say clearly and publicly that you support a particular person, idea, or theory. Note: A ship's colours are its national flag. In the Thatcher years, the young MP nailed his colours to Mrs T's mast more firmly than most. This was the moment he nailed his colours to the mast of Social Security reform. Note: Battleships used to lower their colours to show that they were surrendering. Sometimes the colours were nailed to the mast as a sign of determination to fight to the end.
See also: colour, mast, nail

nail (or pin) your colours to the mast

declare openly and firmly what you believe or favour.
See also: colour, mast, nail

nail your colours to the ˈmast

(especially British English) show clearly which side you support: It’s time to nail our colours to the mast and condemn this dreadful policy. OPPOSITE: sit on the fenceIn this expression, colours are flags. In a battle at sea, a ship would nail its colours to the mast to show its intention to continue fighting and not surrender.
See also: colour, mast, nail
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, it is expected to significantly increase operational availability compared with current photonics masts, says the ONR.
Committee vice-chairman MP Adnan Al Malki claimed telecom masts were a main source of illness and sickness among children, when they are erected near schools and kindergartens - despite studies
This way we can bring in our thoughts and views on this and attempt for a mechanism to organise the erection of masts," he said.
Mast stood accused of having a sexual relationship with a former student during the summer of 2008, in the months before she turned 18.
Under the Telecommunications Act 1984 mast owners have considerable powers to remain on your land.
Coun Bob Beauchamp (Con, Erdington) said: "The companies should be told to share masts otherwise every part of Birmingham could be cluttered with five or six.
They could be seen from a long way away and I'm sure on long journeys people would see the masts in the distance and know they were nearly home.
Residents refused to give up their fight against the structure after the mast was granted planning permission by Cardiff council in spite of hundreds of objections.
As can be seen from the foregoing analysis, in the modelling and design of guyed masts with combined guys, suitable design parameters should be selected.
She said: "There are reports that say these mobile phone masts are harmful to the health of people living in close proximity to them.
A total of 1800 masts are to be built across Britain to provide communications links between train drivers and signal staff.
THE Mayor of Kerry has claimed that Telecommunications giants such as Vodaphone and O2 should be forced to pay levees for the erection of mobile phone masts in the county.
These rights allow companies to build masts without planning permission - but only if they are under 15 metres.
This reference spends considerable time on the advantages of using life insurance masts and charitable masts, as well as estate planning in an uncertain environment.
And he is demanding a government rethink of rules which mean that residents cannot object to masts on health grounds.