Mary


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Related to Mary: Mary Magdalene

Jesus, Mary, and Joseph!

An exclamation of shock, surprise, or exasperation. Jesus, Mary, and Joseph! Don't sneak up on me like that—you scared me half to death! I mean, Jesus, Mary, and Joseph! Does my boss expect me to be on the clock 24 hours a day?
See also: and

Marie Celeste

A place, location, or high-occupancy vehicle (especially a ship) that is inexplicably deserted or abandoned. An allusion to the Mary Celeste, an American merchant brigantine that was discovered floating off the Azores Islands in 1872 with no one on board and still in seaworthy condition. (Note: The variant spelling of "Marie" is the more common usage for the idiomatic reference, likely due to its use in a story by Arthur Conan Doyle.) We came upon a house in the woods, empty as the Marie Celeste, but left otherwise untouched.

sweet Mary, mother of God

An exclamation of alarm, amazement, or exasperation. (Could be considered blasphemous to some.) Sweet Mary, mother of God, I thought that car was going to hit me! Oh, sweet Mary, mother of God, could you work any slower?
See also: god, mother, of, sweet

Mary Sue

In film and literature, an idealized female character who is exceptionally talented in a number of areas despite not having had the training or experience to realistically acquire such talents. The use of such a character is often seen as a method of author wish-fulfillment. The term was first used in this way by writer Paula Smith in 1973. Whether Rey from Star Wars is a Mary Sue has been a topic of debate.
See also: Mary, sue

Typhoid Mary

A person, especially a woman, who spreads misery or ill fortune to other people or endeavors. A reference to the epithet of Mary Malon, a cook who was thought to have infected 22 people with typhoid fever from 1900-1907 as an asymptomatic carrier. You treat me like I'm some kind of Typhoid Mary, but it's only your mismanagement that has brought ruin to this farm. After yet another company where she worked went bankrupt, Janet began to feel like something of a Typhoid Mary.
See also: Mary

Mary J

slang Marijuana. Hey man, you know where we can score some Mary J around here? I only smoke Mary J on my own, because I get really paranoid around other people.
See also: Mary

Mary Jane

slang Marijuana. Hey man, you know where we can score some Mary Jane around here? I only smoke Mary Jane on my own, because I get really paranoid around other people.
See also: Jane, Mary

typhoid Mary

A carrier or spreader of misfortune, as in I swear he's a typhoid Mary; everything at the office has gone wrong since he was hired . This expression alludes to a real person, Mary Manson, who died in 1938. An Irish-born servant, she transmitted typhoid fever to others and was referred to as "typhoid Mary" from the early 1900s. The term was broadened to other carriers of calamity in the mid-1900s.
See also: Mary

Typhoid Mary

You can describe someone as Typhoid Mary if they bring bad luck or harm to other people. After the relationship ended, she became a Typhoid Mary, spoiling the romantic lives of everyone around her. Note: Typhoid Mary was a cook who spread the disease typhoid to several hospitals that she worked in, though she never became ill herself.
See also: Mary

Mary Jane

1. and Mary J. and Maryjane n. marijuana. (see also jane.) I can’t live another day without Mary Jane!
2. n. a plain-looking girl. She’s just a Mary Jane and will never be a glamour girl.
See also: Jane, Mary

Mary J.

verb
See also: Mary
References in classic literature ?
When Caleb Garth arrived at Stone Court soon after dusk, Mary was not surprised, although he seldom had leisure for paying her a visit, and was not at all fond of having to talk with Mr.
Mary was his favorite child, and whatever Susan might say, and right as she was on all other subjects, Caleb thought it natural that Fred or any one else should think Mary more lovable than other girls.
I'm afraid Fred is not to be trusted, Mary," said the father, with hesitating tenderness.
And so should I, father," said Mary, not looking up, but putting the back of her father's hand against her cheek.
You lose the one hope I have for you," she answered, gravely--"the hope of your meeting and your marriage with Mary in the time to come.
Never, as I could well believe, was such a one as Mary for luring a man back to cheerfulness.
After she was gone Mary turned down the walk which led to the door in the shrubbery.
The place was bare and ugly enough, Mary thought, as she stood and stared about her.
He looked startled when he saw Mary, and then touched his cap.
As she was not at all a timid child and always did what she wanted to do, Mary went to the green door and turned the handle.
Well, Bert an' Mary, here you are at Saxon's and my wedding supper.
Now that's my door, all right," Mary exclaimed, carefully putting her wools away, as a succession of knocks reverberated unnecessarily, accompanied by a sound of people stamping their feet and laughing.
Before long, therefore, the groups on the mattresses and the groups on the chairs were all in communication with each other, and Mary Datchet, who had begun to darn stockings again, stooped down and remarked to Ralph:
Let's go and tell him how much we liked it," said Mary, thus suggesting an action which Ralph was anxious to take, though without her he would have been too proud to do it, for he suspected that he had more interest in Katharine than she had in him.
That was a very interesting paper," Mary began, without any shyness, seating herself on the floor opposite to Rodney and Katharine.