Marie Celeste

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Related to Marie: Marie Curie
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Marie Celeste

A place, location, or high-occupancy vehicle (especially a ship) that is inexplicably deserted or abandoned. An allusion to the Mary Celeste, an American merchant brigantine that was discovered floating off the Azores Islands in 1872 with no one on board and still in seaworthy condition. (Note: The variant spelling of "Marie" is the more common usage for the idiomatic reference, likely due to its use in a story by Arthur Conan Doyle.) We came upon a house in the woods, empty as the Marie Celeste, but left otherwise untouched.
References in classic literature ?
Clare, mentally; but aloud he added, "Come, now, Marie, what do you think of the likeness?
Duchesse de Berri = Marie Caroline (1798-1870), wife of Charles Ferdinand of Artois, Duke of Berry, second son of King Charles X; femme de chambre = lady's maid}
At the same time the officer could see the eyes of Marie de Mancini shine in the sun with the brilliancy of a dagger starting from its sheath.
The cardinal might have yielded," said Marie, "if you had addressed yourself to him, if you had pressed him.
She was the first to cast her into ignominy; but when they all heard that Marie had returned to the village, they ran out to see her and crowded into the little cottage--old men, children, women, girls--such a hurrying, stamping, greedy crowd.
Marie bore all this; and I could see when I got to know her that she thought it quite right and fitting, considering herself the lowest and meanest of creatures.
When the old woman took to her bed finally, the other old women in the village sat with her by turns, as the custom is there; and then Marie was quite driven out of the house.
When the mother died, the village parson was not ashamed to hold Marie up to public derision and shame.
The parson, a young fellow ambitious of becoming a great preacher, began his sermon and pointed to Marie.
Only the children had altered--for then they were all on my side and had learned to love Marie.
And again the thirty-six-hundredweight of horses on either side pitted its strength against the similar weight on the other side, and the seeming was that Marie was the link of woman-flesh being torn asunder.
I don't need Marie to dress me this season, so she keeps house for me, and my little Galway girl has gone home for a visit.
Though Marie is clean --really clean, as the French are.
It was very jolly," he murmured lazily, as Marie came in to take away the coffee.
I 'm Polly at home and I 'm fond of being called so; but Marie is Frenchified and silly.