Marches


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Related to Marches: marchesa, Welsh Marches
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march to (the beat of) a different drum

To do something, act, or behave in a manner that does not conform to the standard, prevalent, or popular societal norm. My brother's eschewed the idea of a full-time career and has had every oddball job you could think of, but then he's always been happy marching to the beat of a different drum. Look, I respect the fact that you like to march to a different drum, but do you have to make a point of doing everything in a counter-cultural way?
See also: beat, different, drum, march

march to (the beat of) (one's) own drum

To do something, act, or behave in a manner that does not conform to the standard, prevalent, or popular societal norm. My brother's eschewed the idea of a full-time career and has had every oddball job you could think of, but then he's always been happy marching to the beat of his own drum. Look, I respect the fact that you like to march to your own drum, but do you have to make a point of doing everything in a counter-cultural way?
See also: beat, drum, march, own

march to (one's) own beat

To do something, act, or behave in a manner that does not conform to the standard, prevalent, or popular societal norm. My brother's eschewed the idea of a full-time career and has had every oddball job you could think of, but then he's always been happy marching to his own beat. Look, I respect the fact that you like to march to your own beat, but do you have to make a point of doing everything in a counter-cultural way?
See also: beat, march, own

slow march

1. A slow but steady progression toward a particular end. We know now that Gladys has been on a slow march toward death—her condition is terminal. I'm afraid that, without any changes, the company is on a slow march toward bankruptcy.
2. A slower-paced, rhythmic piece of music originally used to accompany marching soldiers. We're rehearsing a slow march for the concert on Sunday.
See also: march, slow

an army marches on its stomach

A well-fed army is most effective. The cook may be the most important person in the unit because an army marches on its stomach.
See also: army, Marches, on, stomach

march to (the beat of) a different drummer

To do something or behave in a manner that does not conform to the standard, prevalent, or popular societal norm. My brother's eschewed the idea of a full-time career and has had every oddball job you could think of, but then he's always been happy marching to the beat of a different drummer.

march to a different beat

To do something, act, or behave in a manner that does not conform to the standard, prevalent, or popular societal norm. My brother's eschewed the idea of a full-time career and has had every oddball job you could think of, but then he's always been happy marching to a different beat. Look, I respect the fact that you like to march to a different beat, but do you have to make a point of doing everything in a contrarian way?
See also: beat, different, march

march to (the beat of) a different tune

To do something or behave in a manner that does not conform to the standard, prevalent, or popular societal norm. My brother's eschewed the idea of a full-time career and has had every oddball job you could think of, but then he's always been happy marching to the beat of a different tune.
See also: beat, different, march, tune

quick march

1. noun A very quick or brisk walk. But it was no quick march for the celebrity, who made a point of shaking the hands of as many fans as he could.
2. verb To walk very quickly or briskly. A reference to military marching, the phrase is often issued as a command. Police are pursuing a suspect who was seen quick marching away from the scene of the crime. Come on, now, quick march! It's starting to rain.
See also: march, quick

march on

1. To continue walking or marching forward. We had no choice but to march on, despite the rain.
2. To continue doing something or making progress. We've run into a few problems with the software, but we're still marching on to meet our December deadline.
3. To move forward unabated or unhindered. Each day marches on, and before we know it, we're in our 50s with all the promise of our youth behind us.
See also: march, on

march against (someone or something)

To join in a protest march in opposition to someone or something. Nearly 200,000 people have come to march against the legislation being pushed forward by the new administration. Protestors marching against the new prime minister were violently dispelled by police forces earlier this morning.
See also: march

march in step (with someone or something)

1. Literally, to follow or maintain the proper rhythm of someone or something else while marching. It was impressive to see so many troops all marching in step during the military parade. The children marched in step with their teacher as they walked to the library.
2. To conform to or act in accordance with someone or something, especially by doing what is considered correct, proper, acceptable, etc. You really need to start marching in step if you want to keep your job as our lead artist—you work for the company, not for yourself. The senator is often criticized for not marching in step with the views of her political party, but that's why so many people across the country love her.
See also: march, someone, step

march out of step (with someone or something)

1. Literally, to fail to follow or maintain the proper rhythm of someone or something else while marching. It was almost painful watching them all march out of step during the parade like that—it was obvious they hadn't spent any time practicing or rehearsing. One little boy kept marching out of step with the rest of his class as they walked across the stage.
2. To fail or refuse to conform to or act in accordance with someone or something, especially by doing what is considered correct, proper, acceptable, etc. You really need to stop marching out of step if you want to keep your job as our lead artist—you work for the company, not for yourself. The senator is often criticized for marching out of step with the views of her political party, but that's why so many people across the country love her.
See also: march, of, out, someone, step

march out of time (with someone or something)

1. Literally, to fail to follow or maintain the proper rhythm of someone or something else while marching. It was almost painful watching them all march out of time during the parade like that—it was obvious they hadn't spent any time practicing or rehearsing. One little boy kept marching out of time with the rest of his class as they walked across the stage.
2. To fail or refuse to conform to or act in accordance with someone or something, especially by doing what is considered correct, proper, acceptable, etc. You really need to stop marching out of time if you want to keep your job as our lead artist—you work for the company, not for yourself. The senator is often criticized for marching out of time with the views of her political party, but that's why so many people across the country love her.
See also: march, of, out, someone, time

march past

1. Literally, to walk past (someone or something) in a unified group or regimented file or formation. We all trembled in fear as the soldiers marched past. As if to add insult to injury at having to stay home and study, a huge crowd of people all marched past my window on their way to the ceremony.
2. To proceed or progress onward toward the future without one. My greatest fear is being stuck in some dead-end job, watching the days of my life march past. They deserve the disqualification—let the championship march past them this year!
See also: march, past

An army marches on its stomach.

Prov. An army needs a regular supply of food in order to keep on fighting. The invading army will soon have to pull back. An army marches on its stomach, and they're out of food.
See also: army, Marches, on, stomach

march on

 
1. Lit. to continue marching. Please march on. Don't stop here; there are other parts of the parade coming along behind you. Let's march on. We have a long way to go.
2. Fig. [for time] to continue. Time marches on. We are all getting older. As the day marches on, try to get everything completed.
See also: march, on

march past someone or something

to move in a file or formation past someone or something. The people in the parade marched past the children standing on the curb. The soldiers marched past the general.
See also: march, past

march to a different beat

Also, march to a different drummer. Act independently, differ in conduct or ideas from most others, as in Joe wanted to be married on a mountain top-he always marches to a different beat, or Sarah has her own ideas for the campaign; she marches to a different drummer. This idiom, alluding to being out of step in a parade, is a version of Henry David Thoreau's statement in Walden (1854): "If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer." It came into wide use in the mid-1900s.
See also: beat, different, march

an army marches on its stomach

soldiers or workers can only fight or function effectively if they have been well fed.
The saying has been attributed to both Frederick the Great and Napoleon I. It is a version of the French phrase c'est la soupe qui fait le soldat .
See also: army, Marches, on, stomach

ˌquick ˈmarch

used for telling somebody to walk faster: Come on! Quick march or we’ll miss the bus.
‘Quick march’ is also a command given to soldiers.
See also: march, quick

march on

v.
1. To continue to march: The militia marched on despite the jeers from the people on the sidewalk.
2. To assemble and walk to some place in order to express an opinion, especially opposition, to people of power there: The employees' union marched on the state capitol.
See also: march, on
References in periodicals archive ?
Marches have also served an important economic role in developing groups, emphasizes Dianne Hardy-Garcia, executive director of this year's march.
Carter, who was on the boards of the 1987 and 1993 marches, told the board in a December meeting, "If I continue to hear about the 50% people of color on the MMOW board, I'm going to scream.
We're hoping the march continues the legacy of past marches to inspire a new generation of leaders to form a new generation of organizations," she says.
Wherever the idea for the previous marches came from, the idea was accompanied by meetings around the country to hash out questions: Is this the right time to march?
March organizers also emphasize that controversy often surrounds national marches, including the landmark 1963 civil rights march on Washington, and has been a factor in each of the national gay civil rights marches.
The idea for the national assembly came from Robin Tyler, a veteran activist who has organized women's music festivals as well as the rallies at the three previous gay and lesbian marches on Washington.