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wham, bam, thank you, ma'am

1. slang Hasty sexual activity, especially when rough, unemotional, or unromantic. Hyphenated if used as a modifier before a noun. We only had about half an hour before the kids came home, so it was just wham, bam, thank you, ma'am. I've never enjoyed the wham-bam-thank-you-ma'am kind of sex most other guys in college seem to desire.
2. slang Anything done or put together very quickly or without careful planning. Hyphenated if used as a modifier before a noun. The film just felt a bit "wham, bam, thank you, ma'am"—a bunch of explosions and car chases strung together for an hour and a half, and then it was over. A stir fry is a great wham-bam-thank-you-ma'am dinner that you can throw together in a matter of minutes.
See also: thank

wham bam thank you ma'am

Rur. a bump in the road. We hit a wham bam thank you ma'am and lost one of our hubcaps. Watch out for the wham bam thank you ma'am at the corner of Third Street.
See also: bam, thank, wham

wham-bam-thank-you-ma'am

used in reference to sexual activity conducted roughly and quickly, without tenderness.

Fo shizzle, ma nizzle!

phr. For sure, my nigga! (Streets.) Am I here? Fo shizzle, ma nizzle.
See also: FO, ma

Ma Bell

n. AT&T, the American Telephone and Telegraph Company; any telephone company. (see also Baby Bell.) Ma Bell is still one of the largest firms in the nation.
See also: bell, ma

Just the facts, Ma'am

Don't embellish your story. Many expressions moved from a movie or television program to popular speech, but none more quickly than a misquotation (as it turns out) of a lines by Sergeant Joe Friday, played by Jack Webb on the 1950s TV series Dragnet. With his deadpan expression and staccato speech, Friday enthralled the public; Dragnet was one of the highest-rated drama series of the decade. At least once in every show, viewers heard Friday tell a female witness, “Just the facts, Ma'am.” Except they didn't. He might have said, “Give us the facts, ma'am,” but he never uttered the four-word phrase. No matter, because the phrase swept the country in a wide range of contexts. If you wanted to be thought of (if only by yourself) as clever, you interjected “Just the facts, Ma'am” delivered in a Friday voice in a question or request. Oh well, Humphrey Bogart's character Rick in the movie Casablanca never said “Play it again, Sam” either.
See also: just