lung

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Related to Lungs: lung cancer

air one's lungs

 
1. Rur. to swear. Don't pay those old cowboys no mind. They're just airin' the lungs. I could tell John was working on his old car 'cause I could hear him out in the garage, airin' his lungs. 2. Rur. to talk, gossip, or brag. The ladies just love to air their lungs whenever they get together.
See also: air, lung

at the top of one's voice

 and at the top of one's lungs
Fig. very loudly. Bill called to Mary at the top of his voice. How can I drive safely when you're all screaming at the top of your lungs?
See also: of, top, voice

at the top of your lungs

also at the top of your voice
as loudly as you can She sang the national anthem at the top of her lungs.
See also: lung, of, top

have a [fine/good etc.] pair of lungs

  (humorous)
if you say that a baby has a good pair of lungs, you mean that they can cry very loudly Well she's got a fine pair of lungs, I'll say that for her!
See also: have, lung, of, pair

at the top of your voice

if someone says something at the top of their voice, they say it as loudly as they can 'Stop it Nathan!' she shouted at the top of her voice.
See also: of, top, voice

at the top of one's lungs

Also, at the top of one's voice. With an extremely loud voice. For example, The babies in the nursery all were crying at the top of their lungs. The noun top here refers to the greatest degree of volume (that is, loudest) rather than high pitch, a usage dating from the mid-1500s.
See also: lung, of, top

lung-butter

n. vomit. God, you got lung-butter on my shoe!

at the top of (one's) lungs

As loudly as one's voice will allow.
See also: lung, of, top

at the top of (one's) voice

As loudly as one's voice will allow.
See also: of, top, voice
References in classic literature ?
Weakly I rose for the last time--my tortured lungs gasped for the breath that would fill them with a strange and numbing element, but instead I felt the revivifying breath of life-giving air surge through my starving nostrils into my dying lungs.
Tarzan's lungs were bursting for a breath of pure fresh air.
I felt no particular distress until I suddenly started upward at ever-increasing velocity; then my lungs seemed about to burst, and I must have lost consciousness, for I remember nothing more until I opened my eyes after listening to a torrent of invective against Germany and Germans.
His endurance was faltering, but he compelled his arms and legs to drive him deeper until his will snapped and the air drove from his lungs in a great explosive rush.
He gargled his mouth and throat, took a suck at a divided lemon, and all the while the towels worked like mad, driving oxygen into his lungs to purge the pounding blood and send it back revivified for the struggle yet to come.
That's why they go in so easily if you lace tight and squeeze the lungs and heart in the let me see, what was that big word oh, I know thoracic cavity," and Rose beamed with pride as she aired her little bit of knowledge.
I struggled along heroically, my correlations breaking down, my legs tottering under me, my head swimming, my heart pounding, my lungs panting for air.
Two white men an' a Swede froze to death that night, an' there was a dozen busted their lungs.
The lungs absorb the oxygen, which is indispensable for the support of life, and reject the nitrogen.
All physiologists admit that the swimbladder is homologous, or 'ideally similar,' in position and structure with the lungs of the higher vertebrate animals: hence there seems to me to be no great difficulty in believing that natural selection has actually converted a swimbladder into a lung, or organ used exclusively for respiration.
When he came to himself, he began to cry and shriek at the top of his lungs, stamping his feet on the ground and wailing all the while:
I gasped with the anguish and shock of it, filling my lungs before the life-preserver popped me to the surface.
The medical man who examined him, being informed of this circumstance, considered the post-mortem appearances as being perfectly compatible with murder by smothering--that is to say, with murder committed by some person, or persons, pressing the pillow over the nose and mouth of the deceased, until death resulted from congestion of the lungs.
But these fellows having for the most part strong lungs, and being naturally fond of singing, chanted any ribaldry or nonsense that occurred to them, feeling pretty certain that it would not be detected in the general chorus, and not caring much if it were.
As Oliver gave this first proof of the free and proper action of his lungs, the patchwork coverlet which was carelessly flung over the iron bedstead, rustled; the pale face of a young woman was raised feebly from the pillow; and a faint voice imperfectly articulated the words, 'Let me see the child, and die.