lookout

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Related to Lookout Cape: Cape Lookout State Park, Cape Lookout National Seashore

keep a sharp lookout (for something or someone)

To remain vigilant or carefully watchful (for something or someone). They should be arriving any minute, so keep a sharp lookout. Keep a sharp lookout for a Christmas present we could give your mother. Keep a sharp lookout for the health inspector, we heard he'll be doing a surprise inspection someday soon.

be on the lookout

Watching for something or someone. Be on the lookout for my email! It will have all the instructions you need for the project. A: "What are you guys doing?" B: "We're on the lookout for mom's car, so we can tell dad to stop working on her surprise gift when she gets here."
See also: lookout, on

look out (of) something

to gaze outward from inside something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) Look out of the window and see if it is raining. I looked out of the door to see what the weather was like.
See also: look, out

on the lookout (for someone or something)

watchful for someone or something. Be on the lookout for signs of a storm. I'm on the lookout for John, who is due here any minute.
See also: lookout, on

keep an eye out for

Also, keep a sharp lookout for. Be watchful for something or someone, as in Keep an eye out for the potholes in the road, or They told him to keep a sharp lookout for the police. The first expression, sometimes amplified to keep a sharp eye out for, dates from the late 1800s, the variant from the mid-1700s. Also see have one's eye on, def. 1; keep a weather eye; keep one's eyes open; look out.
See also: eye, keep, out

look out

Also, watch out. Be careful, be watchful, as in Look out that you don't slip and fall on the ice, or Watch out! There's a car coming. [c. 1600] Also see look out for.
See also: look, out

on the lookout

Also, on the watch. Vigilant, alert, as in Be on the lookout for the twins-they're somewhere on this playground, or He was on the watch for her arrival. Both phrases were originally used with upon. Upon the lookout was originally nautical usage, meaning "on duty being watchful" (as for another ship, rocks, or land); it appeared in the mid-1700s, and on replaced upon about a century later. Upon the watch was first recorded in Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe (1719), and on the watch in Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility (1797).
See also: lookout, on

keep an eye out (or open) for

look out for something with particular attention.
1996 Guardian Keep an eye open for kingklip, a delectable fish, and the superb local hake.
See also: eye, keep, out

be on the lookout

1 keep searching for someone or something that is wanted. 2 be alert to danger or trouble.
The word lookout , which originated in naval and military contexts, was first applied, in the late 17th century, to sentries or other people employed to keep watch. The sense of ‘the action of keeping watch’, as used in this expression, dates from the mid 18th century.
See also: lookout, on

be ˈsb’s (own) lookout

(British English, informal) be somebody’s problem because they are responsible for causing it: If he wants to invest all his money in one company, that’s his lookout.It’s my own lookout if I fail this exam.
See also: lookout

be on the ˈlookout (for somebody/something)

,

keep a ˈlookout (for somebody/something)

be searching (for somebody/something): We’re always on the lookout for good computer programmers.I’m on the lookout for a good book on German history.
See also: lookout, on

look out

v.
To be watchful or careful; take care: If you don't look out, you could fall on the ice. The campers looked out for each other on the hike.
See also: look, out