liar

(redirected from Liars)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Liars: sociopath

barefaced liar

One who tells blatantly obvious and/or impudent untruths easily and with little or no attempt to disguise the lie. Everyone knows he is just a barefaced liar. It's a wonder anyone believes a thing he says anymore.
See also: barefaced, liar

bald-faced liar

One who tells blatantly obvious and/or impudent untruths easily and with little or no attempt to disguise the lie. Everyone knows he is just a bald-faced liar. It's a wonder anyone believes a thing he says anymore.
See also: liar

bold-faced liar

One who tells blatantly obvious and/or impudent untruths easily and with little or no attempt to disguise the lie. Everyone knows he is just a bold-faced liar. It's a wonder anyone believes a thing he says anymore.
See also: liar

liar is not believed (even) when he tells the truth

Prov. If people think that you are a liar, they will not believe anything you say. As it turned out, Fred was right when he warned his friends that the police were planning to raid their party; but they paid no attention to him, since they knew him to be a liar, and a liar is not believed even when he tells the truth.
See also: believe, he, liar, not, tell, truth
References in periodicals archive ?
How I know goes back to the dawn of human history: In evolutionary terms, being a successful liar constituted what anthropologists call "a selective advantage.
For decades, psychologists have done laboratory experiments in an attempt to describe differences between the behavior of liars and of people telling the truth.
Gravity-defying gestures symbolize emphasis and true sentiment, both of which liars rarely possess.
Women are not only bigger liars but are now better liars as well.
7) Although the attorney did not specifically characterize the witness as a "liar," the Fourth District Court of Appeal gratuitously observed "it is permissible for an attorney to comment on the credibility of a witness, for example by calling the witness a liar, when it is with reference to the testimony given and the attorney is merely drawing a conclusion from the evidence.
But some of the best known liars out there have an Irish connection so we like to keep that alive.
These signals, some of which can pass in a split second, indicate the leakage of emotions that the liar would rather keep hidden: guilt, anger, fear, embarrassment, or "duping delight," the glee some liars feel at deceiving their targets.
The essence of their arguments can be reduced to the fact that hard-core liars do so for three primary purposes: punishment, protection, and self-promotion.
Two movie producers are suing Hollywood moguls for at least pounds 15 million over the blockbuster comedy Liar, Liar.
I have never read a real estate book with as much humor and education packed between two covers," said Dave Ramsey, best selling author and national syndicated radio host in his foreword to Buyers Are Liars and Sellers Are Too
The report says that liars can't help feeling a bit nervous when telling a lie, and to hide this nervousness, they will try to keep their vocal tone very stable and their voice can come out as a monotone.
Psychologist Samantha Mann, of Portsmouth University, said: "People expect liars to be shifty and to fidget.
Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them, A Fair and Balance Look at the Right
Whatever else you do this month of pride, make a promise to speak up for yourself and to call the hatemongers by their true names: liars and coconspirators in every bashing or murder targeting someone gay, lesbian, or transgendered.
By the prosecution's own admission, the juries, first at Maidstone Crown Court and this week at Nottingham Crown Court, had either to believe the word of liars and thieves or they had to acquit Michael Stone.