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Related to Lesses: lessees

more haste, less speed

Acting too quickly and without due diligence, focus, and attention to detail will result in avoidable mistakes and thus require even more time to complete the task satisfactorily. (The logic of the phrase is essentially "too much haste results in less overall speed.") Primarily heard in UK. I know we're all eager to get the new software released to the public, but remember: more haste, less speed. We don't want to end up wasting time fixing bugs that could have been avoided.
See also: less, more, speed

could care less

Does not care about something at all. The phrase is a colloquial version of "could not care less." Fine, I could care less what you do! Good riddance! You're going out with my ex-boyfriend? Great. I could care less.
See also: care, could, less

less and less

A phrase indicating that something is dwindling or becoming less frequent. She used to make mistakes all the time, but now that she's familiar with the job, it's been happening less and less. I have less and less interest in Adam the more time I spend with him.
See also: and, less

could(n't) care less

[one is] unable to care at all; it does not matter at all. John couldn't care less whether he goes to the party or not. I could care less if I live or die.
See also: care, could, less

(I) could(n't) care less.

Inf. It doesn't matter to me. (The less bears the heaviest stress in both versions. Despite the apparent contradiction, either reading of this—both the affirmative and negative—usually have the same meaning. The exception would be in a sentence where the could bears the heaviest stress: I COULD care less, [but I don't.].) Tom: The rain is coming! The carpet will get wet! Mary: I couldn't care less. Bill: I'm going to go in there and tell off the boss? John: I could care less.
See also: care, could, less

in less than no time

Fig. very quickly. (See also in no time (at all).) I'll be there in less than no time. Don't worry. This won't take long. It'll be over with in less than no time.
See also: less, time

in no time (at all)

very quickly. (Compare this with in less than no time.) I'll be there in no time. It won't take long. I'll be finished in no time at all.
See also: time

Less is more.

Cliché fewer or small is better. Simplicity now rules our lives. Less is more. Smaller houses and cars. The world will be a better place!
See also: less, more

less said (about something), the better

Prov. A way of indicating that you think something should not be talked about any further. Jane: How are things going with your divorce proceedings? Ellen: The less said, the better. The less said about my financial situation, the better.
See also: better, less, said

less than pleased

displeased. We were less than pleased to learn of your comments. Bill was less than pleased at the outcome of the election.
See also: less, please

Make haste slowly,

 and More haste, less speed.
Prov. Act quickly, but not so quickly that you make careless mistakes. Jane: Why are you throwing your clothes around the room? Alan: You told me to get my things packed in a hurry. Jane: Yes, but make haste slowly; otherwise we'll have to spend an hour cleaning up the mess you make. I know you want to finish that sweater by Joe's birthday, but you're knitting so fast that you make mistakes. More haste, less speed.
See also: haste, make, slowly

more or less

somewhat; approximately; a phrase used to express vagueness or uncertainty. Henry: I think this one is what I want, more or less. Clerk: A very wise choice, sir. I spent more or less a half hour waiting for my flight to depart.
See also: less, more

somebody couldn't care less

also somebody could care less
someone does not care at all Most fans couldn't care less about it.
See also: care, less

less than something

not something The weekend was less than wonderful, but parts of it were pretty good. The result was less than thrilling television – you could even call it boring.
Usage notes: used to describe a quality you had expected or hoped for
See also: less

no less

this is surprising to me, and must surprise you too I happen to own the very same sweater – and in green, no less. They lost the first two games in a best-of-five series, and on their home field, no less.
See also: less

no less than somebody/something

this very important person or organization Carroll is the most entertaining talk-show host on TV – no less than "Entertainment Weekly" said so. Almost two dozen representatives flew in for meetings with top officials, including no less than the country's president.
See also: less

nothing less than something

strongly showing this quality nothing short of something The violinist's playing is nothing less than magnificent.
Usage notes: used to emphasize the quality mentioned
See also: less, nothing

more or less

1. approximately The box weighs 50 pounds, more or less. Each of the calls was more or less 10 minutes long.
2. to some degree This room is more or less an extra - we don't really need it.
See also: less, more

much less do something

and do not even do this When our headlights flashed, the deer barely blinked, much less moved. They can hardly keep their Internet site running, much less guard against hackers.
See also: less, much

in no time

very quickly I pulled my blanket around me and in no time was fast asleep.
See also: time

couldn't care less

Also, could care less. Be completely indifferent. For example, Pick whatever dessert you want; I couldn't care less, or I could care less about the editor's opinion . This expression originated about 1940 in Britain and for a time invariably used couldn't. About 1960 could was occasionally substituted, and today both versions are used with approximately equal frequency, despite their being antonyms.
See also: care, less

in no time

Also, in no time at all; in less than no time; in nothing flat. Almost instantly, immediately, as in The train will be here in no time at all, or He'll be finished in less than no time, or I'll be there in nothing flat. All these hyperbolic terms equate a very short time with "at once." [First half of 1800s]
See also: time

less than

Not at all or hardly at all. For example, He had a less than favorable view of the matter, or She had a less than adequate grasp of the subject. This expression uses less in the sense of "a smaller quantity, number, or extent than is implied," a usage dating from about a.d. 1000. The same sense appears in less than no time, a hyperbolic term for a very short time (as in Don't worry, he'll be here in less than no time) that dates from about 1800.
See also: less

more or less

1. Approximately, as in The truck will hold nine yards of dirt, more or less. This usage was first recorded in 1589.
2. Basically, essentially, as in We more or less agree on the substance of the letter. This usage was first recorded about 1225.
See also: less, more

much less

And certainly not, as in He rarely talks about his outside activities, much less his family. The earliest record of this idiom is in John Milton's Paradise Lost (1671): "The world thou hast not seen, much less her glory."
See also: less, much

I could(n’t) care less

sent. I don’t care!; I don’t care to the maximum amount, and it is, therefore, impossible to care any less. (The affirmative version does not make sense, but is widely used, nonetheless.) So you’re late. I couldn’t care less.
See also: care, less

I could care less

verb
See also: care, could, less

less than

Not at all: He had a less than favorable view of the matter.
See also: less

in no time

Almost instantly; immediately.
See also: time