legend

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a legend in (one's) own time

A person who has an extraordinary level of fame or reputation while he or she is still alive. The singer has made such a huge impact on the world of blues that she's come to be a legend in her own time.
See also: legend, time

a legend in (one's) own lifetime

A person who has an extraordinary level of fame or reputation while he or she is still alive. The singer has made such a huge impact on the world of blues that she's come to be a legend in her own lifetime.
See also: legend, lifetime

a legend in (one's) own lunchtime

A person who affects or believes him- or herself to be of greater importance or notoriety than is actually the case. A humorous, ironic twist on the phrase "a legend in one's own lifetime." The assistant manager acts as if she's the only one keeping the company together. She's a regular legend in her own lunchtime.
See also: legend

a legend in (one's) own mind

A person who affects or believes him- or herself to be of greater importance or notoriety than is actually the case. A humorous, ironic twist on the phrase "a legend in one's own lifetime." The assistant manager acts as if she's the only one keeping the company together. She's a regular legend in her own mind.
See also: legend, mind

a living legend

A person who has an extraordinary reputation or level of fame while he or she is still alive. The singer has made such a huge impact on the world of blues that she's come to be a living legend.
See also: legend, living

legend in one's own (life)time

Fig. someone who is very famous and widely known for doing something special. The young golfer became a legend in his own lifetime.
See also: legend, time

urban legend

Fig. a myth or piece of folklore that is totally false. That story about the rats in the sewer being as big as dogs is an urban legend. It's just not so.
See also: legend
References in classic literature ?
Ah," replied the sceptical traveller, "but you don't know how much of the old legend may have been made up from the old figures.
For a legend runs that the king, fearful that he would bring others to attack them, sent a party after him to slay him.
I have got an idea, a sublime idea -- your picture shall appear, and my legend likewise.
Poor but honest parents--that is all right--never mind the particulars-- go on with the legend.
When we discovered that, that legend of our driver took to itself a new interest in our eyes.
It was a hazardous, though maybe a gallant thing to do, since it is probable that the legend commonly received has had no small share in the growth of Strickland's reputation; for there are many who have been attracted to his art by the detestation in which they held his character or the compassion with which they regarded his death; and the son's well-meaning efforts threw a singular chill upon the father's admirers.
This is most complimentary to the virtue of Prince Bladud's tears, and strongly corroborative of the veracity of this legend.
Event participants will have the opportunity to put their new information to the test as Vegas Insider and SLC will host a Monday night party during the Sports Legends Challenge to celebrate the kick-off of a new season of professional football.
Myths And Legends Of The Second World War James Hayward Isis Publishing c/o Ulverscroft Large Print (USA) PO Box 1230, West Seneca, NY 14224-1230 0753156636 $32.
Oswald Of Northumbria contains both the legends themselves and contemplative reflections upon their mutability.
Legends of the Rhine is a collection of classic folk tales about the Rhine river in Germany.
Students have told stories about their daily university lives and often created legends surrounding campus experiences: unique and intriguing is CAMPUS LEGENDS: A HANDBOOK, which surveys legends ranging from pure fantasy to theories of professor relationships, pranks, rituals and other folklore.
Urban legends are unbelievable 'city stories' which abound, from the amazing kidney thief who will leave his victims in a tub of ice to the alligator in the toilet or the ghost children of San Antonio who, killed on train tracks, saves anyone whose car would stall nearby.
The book aims to present a coherent theoretical framework for interpreting legends that the author sees as "a traditional product of the Western world" (9).