lay off

(redirected from Laid Off)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

lay off

1. verb To end someone's employment, usually due to a significant change in the company. A noun or pronoun can be used between "lay" and "off." How many people do you think will be laid off in this merger? I figured they would lay me off, I just didn't think it would be this soon.
2. verb To stop bothering someone or leave them alone. Lay off, will you? I'm working as fast as I can! Hey, lay off your brother, OK? Please don't be so rough with him.
3. verb To stop doing or using something. Well, you need to lay off the chocolates if you want to lose weight!
4. verb To designate the boundaries of something. Where is the pool going to go? Have you laid off that part of the yard yet?
5. noun The act of ending someone's employment, usually due to a significant change in the company. In this usage, the phrase is usually written as one word ("layoff"). Do you think this merger will be accompanied by layoffs?
6. noun A period of inactivity. In this usage, the phrase is usually written as one word ("layoff"). The team was rusty after such a long layoff between games.
See also: lay, off

lay someone off (from something)

to put an end to someone's employment at something. The automobile factory laid five hundred people off from work. They laid off a lot of people. We knew they were going to lay a lot of people off.
See also: lay, off

lay off (someone or something)

to leave someone or something alone. Lay off the booze for a while, why don't ya? Lay off me! I didn't do anything!
See also: lay, off

lay off

((of) someone or something) to stop doing something to someone or something; to stop bothering someone or something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) Lay off of me! You've said enough. Please lay off the chicken. I cooked it as best I could.
See also: lay, off

lay off

1. Terminate a person from employment. For example, When they lost the contract, they had to lay off a hundred workers. This expression formerly referred to temporary dismissals, as during a recession, with the idea that workers would be hired back when conditions improved, but with the tendency of businesses to downsize in the 1990s it came to mean "terminate permanently." [First half of 1800s]
2. Mark off the boundaries, as in Let's lay off an area for a flower garden. [Mid-1700s]
3. Stop doing something, quit, as in Lay off that noise for a minute, so the baby can get to sleep, or She resolved to lay off smoking. [Early 1900s]
4. Stop bothering or annoying someone, as in Lay off or I'll tell the teacher. [Slang; c. 1900]
5. Place all or part of a bet with another bookmaker so as to reduce the risk. For example, Some bookmakers protect themselves by laying off very large bets with other bookmakers. [Mid-1900s]
See also: lay, off

lay off

v.
1. To terminate someone's employment, especially temporarily; suspend someone from work: The company had to lay off two dozen workers or it would have gone bankrupt. They had to lay the clerk off for stealing mail.
2. To mark the boundaries of some region and reserve that region; mark something off: We laid off the front part of the yard for a garden and left the back for a lawn. We used lime to lay the field off for the game.
3. To stop using or doing something: I'm going to have to lay off the cigarettes; they're making me sick.
4. Slang To stop bothering someone. Used chiefly as an angry command: Look, I'm trying to work, so just lay off me, okay?
See also: lay, off

lay off

verb
See also: lay, off

lay off (someone/something)

in. to stop bothering or harming someone or something; to stop being concerned about someone or something. Lay off the booze for a while, why don’t ya?
See also: lay, off, someone, something
References in periodicals archive ?
Tarmy said he did not have information on whether the employees who were laid off were offered jobs in any other of the company's locations.
The Guild will begin working with the company to establish which of the laid off have bumping rights into other positions.
The airline said in September, when it filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, that it would lay off 1,400 flight attendants and 900 were laid off that month, Bloomberg reported.
Employees who are laid off are often out of work through no fault of their own and generally eligible for UI benefits.
The day he was laid off was the same day as the annual Dallas IABC chapter workshop.
When the latest round of firings ends, it is expected that 38 people will have been laid off between the business and editorial departments.
Newhouse Newspapers in New Jersey and Pennsylvania said on Wednesday that they had laid off 60 employees, including 34 at The Star-Ledger of Newark.
Auto Business News-10 November 2009-Toyota to bring back laid off workers(C)2009 ENPublishing - http://www.
An additional 75 employees are to be laid off in the personal wealth management group.
The interruption of the production activity at Raute's Jyvaskyla plant, central Finland, will continues and all hourly workers in the production of the plant are laid off for the time being.
A genuine lay off is not a redundancy and an employee who has been laid off by his/her employer is still employed by that employer.
HUNDREDS of workers at a Bernard Matthews factory are set to be laid off in the wake of the bird flu outbreak, it was revealed yesterday.
COOS BAY - Dozens of lumber mill workers on the south coast are expected to be laid off within the next four months because of the slumping industry.
Four days earlier, after a week of missed payroll deadlines, virtually the entire crew and staff at QTN--over 100 employees--were laid off without payment for their work in the month of January [see sidebar].