jump rope

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jump rope

To jump or skip repeatedly over a length of rope, cord, or the like, which is swung over and around the jumper's entire body by the jumper or two others. One of our favorite things to do when we were little was to jump rope! Even as an adult, jumping rope is a great form of exercise!
See also: jump, rope
References in periodicals archive ?
During the jumping rope training, all the repetitions were guided by metronome rates of 120 rotations per min to ensure equal exercise intensity among children.
That's why we decided to offer the weighted jumping rope, because we have done a lot of research on the benefits of jump rope exercises,” Allen stated.
Unlike running, biking, or team sports, jumping rope is an activity that everyone in the family can do together, at individualized pace and exertion level, regardless of age or cardiovascular conditioning.
In addition to the preferred choice of ropes and mats, the following are some ideas for introducing jumping rope to children with visual impairments.
People have been jumping rope for hundreds of years.
He was killed instantly when he slammed into the ground after being attached to a bungee jumping rope which was too long.
Professional boxers, some of the most well-conditioned athletes in the world, have traditionally used jumping rope as an essential part of their fitness programs.
Preliminary results show that hopping on a pogo stick causes the rapid leg-muscle contraction needed to build tone but is much easier on the knees than jumping rope or jogging.
At the elementary school level, at any rate, jumping rope became an almost exclusively female sport.
These events engage students with jumping rope while empowering them to improve their own health and help other students with heart-health issues.
The hope is that someday jumping rope will be an Olympic sport," Butterfield said.
Jump Rope For Heart is a program that promotes physical fitness and heart health through the fun activity of jumping rope.
Third-graders ran an obstacle course that had students running, jumping rope and walking while balancing an eraser on their head.
Shelton recommends running sprints, jumping rope, and boxing.