Darby and Joan

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Related to Joan: Joan of Arc, Pope Joan

Darby and Joan

A devoted elderly couple leading an uneventful life. These paradigms of lengthy connubial bliss first appeared in an 1735 poem by the otherwise-forgotten Henry Woodfall; the Darby in question was the master to whom Woodfall had been a printer's apprentice. More distinguished authors who referred to the couple included Lord Byron, William Makepeace Thackeray, Anthony Trollope, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Henry James. And they also appear in Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II's wistful ballad, The Folks Who Live on the Hill ballad: “We'll sit and look at the same old view / Just we two / Darby and Joan who used to be Jack and Jill . . .”
See also: and
References in classic literature ?
Instead she put her arms about Joan and kissed her.
And in the midst of these alarms it entered the willful head of Joan de Tany that she wished to ride to London town and visit the shops of the merchants.
And so, as Joan de Tany was a spoiled child, they set out upon the road to London; the two girls with a dozen servants and knights; and Roger de Conde was of the party.
At the same time a grim, gray, old man dispatched a messenger from the outlaw's camp; a swarthy fellow, disguised as a priest, whose orders were to proceed to London, and when he saw the party of Joan de Tany, with Roger de Conde, enter the city he was to deliver the letter he bore to the captain of the gate.
All went well and Joan was laughing merrily at the fears of those who had attempted to dissuade her when, at a cross road, they discovered two parties of armed men approaching from opposite directions.
The two girls sat rigid in their saddles watching the encounter, the eyes of Joan de Tany alight with the fire of battle as she followed every move of the wondrous sword play of Roger de Conde.
And as Joan de Tany watched she saw the smile suddenly freeze to a cold, hard line, and the eyes of the man narrow to mere slits, and her woman's intuition read the death warrant of the King's officer ere the sword of the outlaw buried itself in his heart.
Nearly all of the Baron's men were down, when one, an old servitor, spurred to the side of Joan de Tany and Mary de Stutevill.
Take the Lady Mary, John," cried Joan, "I brought Roger de Conde to this pass against the advice of all and I remain with him to the end.
After her, John," commanded Joan peremptorily, and see that you turn not back until she be safe within the castle walls; then you may bring aid.
Miss Joan Stacey very coolly tidied up the papers on her desk.
Miss Joan Stacey, having collected and put away her papers, proceeded to lock up her drawer.
Miss Joan Stacey skewered her business-like black hat on to her head with a business-like black frown before a little mirror, and, as the conversation proceeded, took her handbag and umbrella in an unhurried style, and left the room.
Joan had signed first, saying Pauline could finish it later, with a typical feminine contempt for legal forms.
No; I had to follow rather close to find out about Miss Joan and the fountain pen.