in inverted commas

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in inverted commas

Used to indicate that something one just said is untruthful, ironic, or disingenuous. ("Inverted commas" is another term for quotation marks, chiefly used in British English.) We were "taught," in inverted commas, by the teaching assistant, but we did most of our learning independently.
See also: comma

in inverted commas

BRITISH, SPOKEN
COMMON If you say in inverted commas after or before a word or phrase, you are drawing attention to the word, and showing that it is not an accurate way to describe the situation you are referring to. So, in what sense do you see the students as disadvantaged, in inverted commas? I think that the assumptions of some people were that we would take democratic decisions, well, democratic in inverted commas. Compare with quote, unquote.
See also: comma

in inverted ˈcommas

(spoken) used to show that you think a particular word, description, etc. is not true or appropriate: The manager showed us to our ‘luxury apartment’, in inverted commas.
Inverted commas are another name for quotation marks (‘ ’) or (“ ”).
See also: comma
References in periodicals archive ?
To avoid similarity index scholars commonly use tactics like paraphrasing, putting inverted commas and rearrangement of the paragraph.
It is a great pity, though, that a book so scholarly and so beautifully produced, and which has been so clearly a labour of love, should be marred throughout by poor punctuation and by occasional clumsiness of expression and naivete of style The occasional oscillation between 'smart' and straight inverted commas suggests that the book was printed from camera-ready text; alas that some judicious proof-reading did not intervene to save it from its errors.
Schulte-Sasse's reliance on putting inverted commas around words is a study in itself.
But the shift from italicizing words and phrases which constitute less than a verse to placing full verses in roman type within inverted commas is distracting, especially when they occur alternately.
Double inverted commas are of the German kind, with the opening sign on the line rather than above it (since single inverted commas of the familiar, aerial, kind are available to the printer, it is a pity these were not used throughout).
I use the inverted commas because one of the main things Betts said was that the 31 players who met up with Bennett while the Australian was in this country, do not necessarily represent all those who might be selected for the Four Nations tournament.
Before that, every song I'd written had been 'about something' - in inverted commas - and this was the first time I'd started to look at the lyrics more as a component - not putting focus on it but thinking about the shadow it cast on the wall rather than the object itself.
And, having subsequently familiarised myself with his repertoire I suggest that anyone writing about Dapper Laughs from here on in should shift the inverted commas from the 'sexist' part of the sentence and wrap them instead around the word 'comedian'.
And, having subse quently familiarised myself with his repertoire I suggest that anyone writing about Dapper Laughs from here on in should shift the inverted commas from the 'sexist' part of the sentence and wrap them instead around the word 'comedian'.
Supposedly, if you wish to search for web pages containing certain words, you type those words and see what it comes up with; if you want a precise phrase, however, you put inverted commas round the words.
I'm sure they wouldn't object to the inverted commas, they weren't hacking coal or stacking shelves, they were enjoying themselves giving broadcaster s the benet of their wit and wisdom.
Tim Pole, defending, said: "About two years ago a friend, in inverted commas, introduced him to heroin; and thereafter his life declined at a rapid rate.
The chance came via a cushy Community Programme "job" (the inverted commas are entirely appropriate) writing local history pamphlets.
I put the word only in inverted commas because, by British standards, 500 violent deaths in one city every 12 months still seems like an awful lot.