by virtue of

(redirected from In virtue of)
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Related to In virtue of: Virtueless, virtuously

by virtue of (something)

Due to something; because of something; by reason of something. By virtue of your years of hard work and experience, we think you would be well-suited to a managerial role. I know that you feel the need to intervene by virtue of your role as a father, but you need to allow your children a greater degree of independence.
See also: of, virtue

by virtue of something

because of something; due to something. She's permitted to vote by virtue of her age. They are members of the club by virtue of their great wealth.
See also: of, virtue

by virtue of

Also in virtue of. On the grounds of, by reason of, as in By virtue of a large inheritance she could easily afford not to work. [Early 1300s]
See also: of, virtue

by/in ˈvirtue of something

(formal) because of something: I was invited to a party at the embassy simply by virtue of being British.
See also: of, something, virtue
References in classic literature ?
I mean such conditions as insanity, irascibility, and so on: for people are said to be mad or irascible in virtue of these.
For instance, the name given to the runner or boxer, who is so called in virtue of an inborn capacity, is not derived from that of any quality; for lob those capacities have no name assigned to them.
The things, also, which are said to be such and such in virtue of these qualities, may be contrary the one to the other; for that which is unjust is contrary to that which is just, that which is white to that which is black.
However that may be, it is an incontrovertible fact that the things which in virtue of these qualities are said to be what they are vary in the degree in which they possess them; for one man is said to be better versed in grammar, or more healthy or just, than another, and so on.
One thing is like another only with reference to that in virtue of which it is such and such; thus this forms the peculiar mark of quality.
The knowledge of grammar is not relative to anything external, nor is the knowledge of music, but these, if relative at all, are relative only in virtue of their genera; thus grammar is said be the knowledge of something, not the grammar of something; similarly music is the knowledge of something, not the music of something.
Those particular branches, therefore, of knowledge, in virtue of which we are sometimes said to be such and such, are themselves qualities, and are not relative.