if you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen

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if you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen

If you can't cope with or handle the pressure in a given situation, you should remove yourself from that situation. Typically used to imply that the one being addressed is weak or unsuited for such work. The expression was popularized with US President Harry S. Truman. The pace is only going to pick up from here, newbie, so if you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen.
See also: get, if, kitchen, of, out, stand

If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen.

Prov. If the pressures of some situation are too much for you, you should leave that situation. (Somewhat insulting; implies that the person addressed cannot tolerate pressure.) Alan: I didn't think being a stockbroker could be so stressful. Fred: If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen. Jill: This exercise class is too tough; the teacher should let us slow down. Jane: If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen.
See also: get, if, kitchen, of, out, stand

if you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen

If the pressure or stress is too great, leave or give up. For example, It'll take a lot of weekend overtime to finish, so if you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen . This folksy adage has been ascribed to President Harry S. Truman, who certainly said it and may have originated it. [c. 1950]
See also: get, if, kitchen, of, out, stand

if you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen

You say if you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen to tell someone that if they cannot deal with a difficult situation, they should leave. If the pressure is too much for you, you know what they say, if you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen. Note: This expression is often varied, for instance by using can't take or don't like instead of can't stand, or by saying that someone should get out of the kitchen. I have no sympathy for local shopkeepers. If they can't take the heat, they should get out of the kitchen. If you are a manager of a top football club and you don't like the heat you should get out of the kitchen. Note: This expression became very widely known when the American President Harry S. Truman used it in 1952 to announce that he would not stand again for president.
See also: get, if, kitchen, of, out, stand

if you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen

if you can't deal with the pressures and difficulties of a situation or task, you should leave others to deal with it rather than complaining. proverb
See also: get, if, kitchen, of, out, stand
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