INS


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love-in

1. A gathering focused on personal pleasure involving music, drugs, and sexual acts. Margaret reminisced about when she used to attend love-ins in the '60s.
2. A situation involving lavish mutual praise and admiration. The office party became a love-in as the managers all congratulated each other on their various accomplishments.

shoo-in

Someone or something that is predicted to easily win a competition. Julia is a shoo-in for this year's spelling bee—she's the best speller in the whole town.

break in

1. verb To force entry into something, often a building. They called the police as soon as they heard someone break in downstairs. I had to break in—I didn't have my house key, and no one else was home!
2. verb To interrupt someone or something. I'm sorry to break in, but I have some information that might help. Mom is always using the phone in her office to break in on my conversations!
3. verb To use an object or item enough that it begins to feel comfortable or be more easily usable. Often said of shoes. In this usage, a noun can be used between "break" and "in." It took a while to break in my new leather boots, but they sure are comfy now.
4. verb To teach or train someone to do a new job or task and thereby raise their level of experience beyond that of a novice. Don't worry, I'll break in the new hire before I assign her to your project.
5. verb To destroy a physical structure. In this usage, a noun can be used between "break" and "in." I'll break this door in if you don't come out here right now!
6. noun An instance of forced entry into something, often a building. In this usage, the phrase is usually hyphenated. This neighborhood has had a lot of break-ins recently. A shattered window is often evidence of a break-in.
See also: break

built-in

A shelving unit, bookcase, or other storage unit that is built into the walls of a house or building. I'm disappointed that the closets in the house are so small, but at least there are plenty of built-ins.

cave in

1. verb To collapse into a hollow area below, as of a physical structure or formation. We were able to get the kids out of the house before the roof caved in.
2. verb To collapse, faint, or die, as from over-exertion. I hardly remember the end of the marathon because I caved in as soon as I crossed the finish line.
3. verb To submit, concede, or yield (to someone or something); to surrender or acknowledge defeat. Under the threat of a strike, the management caved in and agreed to reinstate annual pay increases for all employees.
4. noun A collapse into a hollow area below, as of a physical structure or formation. When used as a noun, the phrase is usually hyphenated. The fear of every miner is a cave-in.
See also: cave

break in

 (on someone)
1. to burst into a place and violate some one's privacy. The police broke in on him at his home and arrested him. They needed a warrant to break in.
2. to interrupt someone's conversation. (See also break in (on something).) If you need to talk to me, just break in on me. Feel free to break in if it's an emergency.
See also: break

break in

(on something) to interrupt something; to intrude upon something. (See also break in (on someone).) I didn't mean to break in on your discussion. Please don't break in on us just now. This is important.
See also: break

break in (to something or some place)

to force entry into a place criminally; to enter some place forcibly for the purpose of robbery or other illegal acts. The thugs broke into the liquor store. They broke in and took all the money.
See also: break

break someone in

to train someone to do a new job; to supervise someone who is learning to do a new job. Who will break the new employee in? I have to break in a new receptionist.
See also: break

break something in

 
1. Lit. to crush or batter something to pieces; to break something down. Why are you breaking the door in? Here's the key! Who broke in the door?
2. Fig. to use a new device until it runs well and smoothly; to wear shoes, perhaps a little at a time, until they feel comfortable. I can't drive at high speed until I break this car in. I want to go out this weekend and break in the car. The new shoes hurt her feet because they were not yet broken in.
See also: break

cave in

[for a roof or ceiling] to collapse. The roof of the mine caved in when no one was there. The tunnel caved in on the train.
See also: cave

cave in (to someone or something)

Fig. to give in to someone or something. Finally, the manager caved in to the customer's demands. I refuse to cave in under pressure from my opponent.
See also: cave

ins and outs (of something)

the correct and successful way to do something; the special things that one needs to know to do something. I don't understand the ins and outs of politics. Jane knows the ins and outs of repairing computers.
See also: and, INS, out

break in

1. to interrupt During the day they break in about every half hour to give the latest news.
2. to enter illegally While she was out somebody broke in and stole everything she had.
See also: break

break in something

also break something in
to make something comfortable by using it They're great shoes because I've already broken them in.
See also: break

cave in (to somebody/something)

to agree to something after originally opposing it give in (to somebody/something) If the pressure from your parents becomes too strong, you might cave in and go to graduate school.
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of cave in (to suddenly fall inward)
See also: cave

the ins and outs of something

the details or facts about something In a matter of weeks we all became experts in the ins and outs of airline security. Hong was still learning the ins and outs of the North American market.
See also: and, INS, of, out

the ins and outs

  (informal)
the details or facts about something (usually + of ) I don't know all the ins and outs of the situation but I gather Roger and Mark haven't been getting on too well.
See also: and, INS, out

break in

1. Enter by force, as in The thieves broke in through the back door. [Mid-1500s]Also see break into.
2. Also, break in on. Interrupt or disturb something unexpectedly, as in His assistant broke in with the bad news just as we were ready to sign the agreement, or He broke in on our private talks. [Mid-1600s]
3. Train or instruct someone in a new job or enterprise, as in Every semester she had to break in a new teaching assistant. [Late 1700s]
4. Loosen or soften with use, as in It takes a while to break in a pair of new shoes.
See also: break

cave in

1. Fall in, collapse, as in The earthquake made the walls cave in. [Early 1700s]
2. Give in, admit defeat, as in The prosecutor's questions soon made the witness cave in. [Early 1800s]
3. Collapse, faint, or die from exhaustion, as in After a twenty-mile hike I caved in. [Mid-1800s]
See also: cave

ins and outs

1. The intricate details of a situation or process. For example, It takes a newcomer some time to learn the ins and outs of the legislative process, or David really knows the ins and outs of how this engine works. This usage alludes to the tortuous windings and turnings of a road or path. [Second half of 1600s]
2. Those with position and influence and those without, especially those in office versus those who are not, as in "Juan stood well both with Ins and Outs" (Byron, Don Juan, 1823). [Mid-1700s]
See also: and, INS, out

break in

v.
1. To enter a place forcibly or illegally: While we were out of the house, a thief tried to break in.
2. To interrupt a conversation or discussion: We were talking about the weather when my friend broke in and said it was time to leave.
3. To loosen or soften something with use: I need to break in my new boots before I take any long hikes.
4. To train or domesticate an animal: Be sure to break in your puppies at an early age. The horses were very good to ride once the trainer had broken them in.
5. To accustom someone to a new task: The sergeant broke in the new recruits to the army way of life. It was hard to keep up with the work, but my colleagues broke me in gradually.
See also: break

cave in

v.
To give way; collapse: The sides of the snow fort caved in. The mine shaft caved in on a group of miners, but fortunately they were rescued.
See also: cave

the ins and outs

n. the fine points (of something); the details; the intricacies. I’m learning the ins and outs of this business.
See also: and, INS, out

love-in

1. n. an event during the 1960s where one or more couples made love in a public place. My uncle was at one of those love-ins, and he said if anything was going on, it was going on under blankets.
2. n. an event in the 1960s where everyone became euphoric—with the help of marijuana—about love and respect for their fellow humans. Everyone at the annual company love-in was throwing love bombs around at each other.

shoo-in

(ˈʃuɪn)
n. an easy winner. My horse was a shoo-in. It won by a mile.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dempsey write that, as the LA 8 case began its journey through the courts, Reagan's Justice Department discussed formalizing the practice of using the INS to deport immigrant activists who could not be sufficiently discouraged by criminal prosecution.
In January, the INS detained Khurram Ali, twenty-two, an engineering student at Hunter College in New York, for not paying his college fees, according to wire service reports.
Anyone who walks in voluntarily to register, I don't know why they're treated like a criminal,'' said Zahra Modjarad of Woodland Hills, whose son, 24-year-old Amin Modjarad, was arrested Monday at the INS office in downtown Los Angeles.
NAFSA's new executive director Marlene Johnson was personal friends with INS policy chief Robert Bach.
The INS has opposed their applications for relief of two of the LA-8 under the legalization provisions of the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA), 1996, (132) on the basis of secret evidence.
Accordingly, the administration is merging INS and Social Security system databases to create a worker registry - a list of all people who are authorized to work in this country.
Wildes's other clients allege being "beaten up by INS guards, and left by the guards to be beaten up" by other inmates, he says.
One INS examiner in Baltimore was notorious for asking the question, "What was the last federal holiday?
In fact, the INS minted more citizens in 1993 than in any previous year, breaking a record set in 1944.
Hogan as the executive associate commissioner for operations at INS.
INS has a deep understanding of the key IT issues that face Canadian enterprises having worked with Canadian clients across a range of industries for more than a decade.
In a letter to the Immigration and Naturalization Service released late Wednesday, Riordan asked INS Commissioner Doris Meissner to assign more immigration staff inspectors to speed up the processing.
Before reforming immigration, a new report argues, replace the INS.
On that November day, agents of La Migra, as the INS is known in the Latino community, showed the principal of South High an arrest warrant and told him to order the two boys into his office.
a major program deficiency," is what Doris Meissner, a former INS acting commissioner, called it in a report with Demetrios Papademetriou for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.