I'm all right, Jack

(redirected from I'm Alright Jack)
Also found in: Acronyms.

I'm all right, Jack

The notion of self-centered complacency, i.e., of being satisfied or happy with one's circumstances, and thus unconcerned with anyone else's. Often used as a modifier before a noun, though typically not hyphenated. Primarily heard in UK. What's most interesting is that people who get supplementary income from the government are more likely to have an "I'm all right, Jack" attitude about welfare, tending to oppose broadening the scope to include others who earn less money each week, or none at all.
See also: all, jack

I'm all right, Jack

People say I'm all right, Jack to mean that their own situation is good and they do not care about anyone else. It's easy to think only of yourselves, say `I'm all right Jack' and sign the contract. Note: I'm all right, Jack is used before nouns to describe this kind of attitude. That's a bit of an I'm all right Jack attitude isn't it?
See also: all, jack

I'm all right, Jack

used to express or comment upon selfish complacency. informal
I'm all right, Jack was an early 20th-century catchphrase which became the title of a 1959 British film.
See also: all, jack

I’m all ˈright, Jack

(British English, informal) used by or about somebody who is happy with their own life and does not care about other people’s problems: He has a typical ‘I’m all right, Jack’ attitude — as long as he’s doing well he doesn’t care about anyone else.
See also: all, jack
References in periodicals archive ?
Geoffrey plays Peter making films such as The Pink Panther, I'm Alright Jack,The Ladykillers, Dr Strangelove and Being There, and his accents are spot on.
The Phoenix Four took steps to provide themselves with payouts and healthy pensions and when Rover collapsed, it was then a case of "pull the ladder up - I'm alright Jack," whilst the workers have been left with nothing.
It is 37 years since the seminal film I'm Alright Jack exposed the incompetence of British unions and management, but the spirit of Peter Sellers and Terry-Thomas lives on in Birmingham today.
As well as breaking new ground in sketch comedy, Peter's uncanny ability to inhabit his characters resulted in a string of brilliantly vivid screen performances: from the selfimportant union leader in I'm Alright Jack, to crazed Dr Strangelove, to clueless Inspector Clouseau.
An organisation where the chief executives and chairmen of the country's top firms have made sure their pensions funds are bulging - the I'm Alright Jack syndrome from which lofty position they seek to preach to the rest of us.
His big break came in 1948 with the movie Escape to Broadmoor, and a number of other film roles followed, most notably The Battle of the River Plate, Ben Hur, I'm Alright Jack and The Italian Job.
I'm Alright Jack should hang his legal wig in shame.