I'm all right, Jack

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I'm all right, Jack

The notion of self-centered complacency, i.e., of being satisfied or happy with one's circumstances, and thus unconcerned with anyone else's. Often used as a modifier before a noun, though typically not hyphenated. Primarily heard in UK. What's most interesting is that people who get supplementary income from the government are more likely to have an "I'm all right, Jack" attitude about welfare, tending to oppose broadening the scope to include others who earn less money each week, or none at all.
See also: all, jack

I'm all right, Jack

People say I'm all right, Jack to mean that their own situation is good and they do not care about anyone else. It's easy to think only of yourselves, say `I'm all right Jack' and sign the contract. Note: I'm all right, Jack is used before nouns to describe this kind of attitude. That's a bit of an I'm all right Jack attitude isn't it?
See also: all, jack

I'm all right, Jack

used to express or comment upon selfish complacency. informal
I'm all right, Jack was an early 20th-century catchphrase which became the title of a 1959 British film.
See also: all, jack

I’m all ˈright, Jack

(British English, informal) used by or about somebody who is happy with their own life and does not care about other people’s problems: He has a typical ‘I’m all right, Jack’ attitude — as long as he’s doing well he doesn’t care about anyone else.
See also: all, jack
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1959 Muriel played the part of an announcer in the Peter Sellers film I'm All Right Jack, a role you could say she was made for.
Whatever the state of the nation back then - knee deep in austerity, still reeling from the global financial crisis - film director Danny Boyle and his cast and crew of thousands managed to create something so incredibly special and rousing that for a fleeting moment there was no them and us, no in or out, no go or stay, no I'm all right Jack, pull the ladder up - just a warm air of welcome, of inclusion and unity, which simultaneously managed to celebrate all our differences as well as prompt us to forget them.
When it comes to footballers and survival, it's always I'm all right Jack.
Eating a curry could stave o dementia, so I'm all right Jack, as I eat it four times a week.
She typifies a rightwing I'm All Right Jack, grab what you can and let those who can't rot, mentality.
Thanks to the I'm All Right Jack Brigade, the decent, conscientious poor and needy are suffering, our young people have got zilch to look forward to and all the rest of us can do is rant and rave because there's no solidarity anymore.
He was once one of Britain's biggest box office stars, appearing as an upper class buffoon in 1950s comedies Lucky Jim, I'm All Right Jack and School For Scoundrels.
Hull-born Carmichael made his name playing in a series of films for the Boulting Brothers including Private's Progress (1956), Brothers in Law (1957) and I'm All Right Jack (1959).
I'm All Right Jack, adapted from a work by the same novelist, Alan Hackney, was also produced and directed by the Boulting brothers and very largely starred the same cast.
I am well aware of the indifference to peoples in other parts of the world because of all the complaints about money spent on overseas aid, but we see an attitude of I'm all right Jack when we hear of the misfortune of fellow country people.
He became a post-war star thanks to hits such as Brighton Rock, The Guinea Pig, The Great Escape, and I'm All Right Jack.
I'm all right Jack somehow does not cut it in this day and age with our country in the state in which it finds itself.
He also starred in a series of films for the Boulting Brothers, including Private's Progress (1956), Brothers in Law (1957) and I'm All Right Jack (1959).
Carmichael shot to fame in the 1950s, with starring roles in films like Private's Progress, I'm All Right Jack and School for Scoundrels.
Hull-born Carmichael made his name playing in films for the Boulting Brothers, including Private's Progress in 1956 and I'm All Right Jack in 1959.