humour

(redirected from Humours)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Humours: humoral theory

out of humour

In an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; not feeling well or in good spirits. Primarily heard in UK. I think something is bugging John because he's been rather out of humour lately. After living in Gibraltar for so long, these awful London winters leave me feeling me out of humour.
See also: humour, of, out

be put out of humour

old fashioned To be put in an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; to be made to feel unwell, displeased, or in poor spirits. Primarily heard in UK. I must say, I was put quite out of humor to have been reprimanded like that in front of my colleagues. My wife is always being put out of humour by the cold weather in this part of the country.
See also: humour, of, out, put

feel out of humour

To be in an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; to feel unwell, displeased, or in poor spirits. Primarily heard in UK. I think something is bugging John because it seems like he's been feeling rather out of humour lately. I think you should get to bed earlier because you always wake up feeling so out of humour in the morning.
See also: feel, humour, of, out

be out of humour

To be in an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; to feel unwell, displeased, or in poor spirits. Primarily heard in UK. I think something is bugging John because he's been rather out of humour lately. I think you should get to bed earlier because you're always so out of humour in the morning.
See also: humour, of, out

put (someone) out of humour

old fashioned To put someone in an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; to make someone feel unwell, displeased, or in poor spirits. Primarily heard in UK. Having lived in Gibraltar for most of my life, where the weather remains temperate throughout the year, I must say that these awful London winters put me quite out of humour. It always puts me out of humour to think about the state of our country's political system for too long.
See also: humour, of, out, put

gallows humour

  (British & Australian) also gallows humor (American & Australian)
humour that makes unpleasant things, such as death, seem funny
Usage notes: The gallows are a wooden frame used in the past for killing criminals by hanging them from a rope tied around their neck.
Many of the patients I worked with knew they were dying. There was a lot of gallows humour.
See also: humour

schoolboy humour

  (British & Australian) also schoolboy humor (American & Australian)
stupid jokes that are rude but not very offensive Isn't he a bit old for this type of schoolboy humour?
See also: humour, schoolboy
References in classic literature ?
Her manners were open, easy, and decided, like one who had no distrust of herself, and no doubts of what to do; without any approach to coarseness, however, or any want of good humour.
It was with a sense of luxury that he recognized his power of viewing life here from its inner side, in a way that had been quite foreign to him in his student-days; and, much as he loved his parents, he could not help being aware that to come here, as now, after an experience of home-life, affected him like throwing off splints and bandages; even the one customary curb on the humours of English rural societies being absent in this place, Talbothays having no resident landlord.
They returned in time for the summer term, when their stories of the splendours and hardships of life at sea, the humours of sea-captains, the wonders of night and dawn, and the marvels of the place delighted outsiders, and sometimes found their way into print.
Quite congruously with the placid, erudite, quality of his culture, although, like other poets, he sings much of youth, he is often most successful in the forecast, the expression, of the humours, the considerations, that in truth are more proper to old age:--
He [Chaucer] must have been a man of a most wonderful comprehensive nature, because as it has been truly observed of him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his age.
For her part, she could not help thinking it was an encouragement to vice; but that she knew too much of the obstinacy of mankind to oppose any of their ridiculous humours.
Sharp perceptions hath he, like the people, and changeable humours.