Hong Kong dog

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Hong Kong dog

(ˈhɔŋ ˈkɔŋ ˈdɔg)
n. diarrhea; a case of diarrhea. Andy has a touch of the Hong Kong dog and needs some medicine.
See also: dog, Kong
References in periodicals archive ?
The affected flights also include those between Cebu and Hong Kong, and between Clark, Pampanga and Hong Kong:
Oasis Hong Kong Airlines said it received its AOC from the Hong Kong Civil Aviation Dept.
Maxine Hong Kingston: On International Women's Day, we were standing in front of the White House as part of an anti-war protest organized by Code Pink.
In the 28 countries reporting SARS cases, the People's Republic of China (PRC), particularly the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region and the Beijing Municipality, reported most of the cases.
On July 1st, an estimated half-million demonstrators poured into the streets of Hong Kong's central business district for a mass protest outside the Legislative Council.
This new breed of terrorism is intent on destroying our freedom, our tolerance, our diversity, and our economic well being indeed, the values that are shared by both the United States and Hong Kong.
On Monday, the Galaxy became even better after it acquired the rights to South Korean defender Hong Myung Bo - a favorite among Koreans in Los Angeles and one of the best Asian defenders ever.
Hong, Tomoff, Wozniak, Carter, & Topham, 2000; Marino, 1993).
The article describes and examines the recent development of career development and counseling in Hong Kong in 3 major settings: school, university, and community.
Hong Kong insurance regulators are seeking to address a fundamental problem they face with the Internet-its borderless nature.
It's inside the wood-paneled confines of the exclusive Hong Kong Club that one gets the best sense of the self-doubt that has gripped the city.
After three years of "special autonomy," the unexpected happened to Hong Kong.
HONG KONG--In response to the handover of Hong Kong to China on June 30, 1997, choreographers in the Asian city ambitiously attempted to convey the ensuing confusion and cacophony with works that defied local censorship.
While the world watched the fireworks and celebrations occurring in Hong Kong on July 1, 1997, a far sadder event was, in fact, unfolding.
On July 1 Hong Kongers will no longer pledge their fealty to the queen but to a shipping magnate handpicked by Beijing.