Homeric nod

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Related to Homeric: Homeric simile, Homeric Hymns, Homeros

Homeric nod

A continuity error in a work of fiction. An allusion to the Greek poet Homer, whose epic poems contain several apparent errors in continuity. Though the film is being heralded by many as the director's masterpiece, there is a Homeric nod towards the end that is undeniably jarring.
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References in periodicals archive ?
He also retains the Homeric characteristic of repetition of passages.
As so often happens in Homeric poetry, larger themes and events of the poem are articulated by a character who should not have the omniscience to foretell them.
And yet Greek myth is seen as "best understood as having a dialogic relationship with Near Eastern myth, and a particularly close and multifaceted relationship with OT myth, however mediated" (italics original), and the "main reason" for adducing OT myths is said to be "because their parallels provide a tool for our understanding and interpretation of Homeric epic.
Homeric diction, which developed in a tradition of oral poetry, is largely "formulaic.
But the current site, more than 80 per cent of which is yet to be excavated, is still believed to be the home of King Priam and prince Hector -- a place that 150 years ago was thought to be a figment of Homeric imagination.
Following his premature death, Parry's research was completed by his student Albert Lord, who published The Singer of Tales in 1960; Parry's own papers, edited by his son Adam, were published posthumously under the title of The Making of Homeric Verse (1971).
What chance do you have, finally, of ever thinking critically about anything, as Sappho thought critically about Homeric images and her relation to the polis in her lines "To Anactoria"?
Ulpius and company were attempting to do for the great figures of Christianity what Byzantine chroniclers had done for Homeric heroes.
Harris invests the term carnival with various meanings that intersect with the Homeric, Anancy (African), Christian, and pre-Christian traditions and provide a critical linchpin in reading Ellison's Invisible Man within the space of a cross-cultural and inter-American imagination.
6) For the lingering importance of whether the Homeric poems were composed orally, see, most recently, Hartmut Erbse, "Milman Parry und Homer," Hermes 122 (1994): 257-74.
Killing and being killed has a certain Homeric dignity--Aristotle was the tutor of Alexander, and they were all for that sort of thing--but look at that boiling, oily swarm of mercenaries, profiteers, kidnappers, gangsters, looters, decapitators, child-bombers, spinmeisters, misogynist canaille.
Louis creates the further adventures of Odysseus following up on his Homeric role with the thousand ships, the burning of the towers, and the "gift" horse.
Though Battle And Battle Description In Homer acknolwedges that Homer is a poet, not a staff instructor, author Albracht aplies the Homeric text to create a convincing scene of how the workings of battle proceeded in the Iliad, from the council of war, to marshalling troops, the use of chariots, massed attack and defense, retreat, flight, pursuit, protection in the field, attack and defense of a fortified camp, the siege and defense of a fortified city, and much more.
Its pithiness enacts the distillation that takes place when Longley squeezes expansive Homeric narratives into English verse forms.
is the fact that the influence of Homer had already helped shape the many literary constructions of the Hellenistic world that scholars already acknowledge as intertextual resources for Luke, and that these lay much nearer to hand than did the Homeric epics themselves.