highway

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my way or the highway

If you do not do things the way I want or require, then you can just leave or not participate. I'm here to create the best musicians in the world, so in this room, it's my way or the highway!
See also: highway, way

highways and byways

Both major and minor or lesser-traveled roads. (Often used figuratively to describe paths taken in life.) I'm taking the summer to travel across the Midwest, driving through highways and byways to find all sorts of unique places. By highways and byways, he ended up making a life for himself in a small village in India.
See also: and, highway

highway robbery

outrageous overpricing; a bill that is much higher than normally acceptable but must be paid. (As if one had been accosted and robbed on the open road or in broad daylight.) Four thousand dollars! That's highway robbery for one piece of furniture! I won't pay it! It's highway robbery!
See also: highway, robbery

highways and byways

 
1. major and minor roads. The city council voted to plant new trees along all the highways and byways of the town.
2. Cliché routes and pathways, both major and minor. I hope I meet you again some day on life's highways and byways.
See also: and, highway

highway robbery

The exaction of an exorbitantly high price or fee. For example, You paid ten dollars for that meat? That's highway robbery. This term, used figuratively since the late 1800s, alludes to literal robbery of travelers on or near a public road.
See also: highway, robbery

highway robbery

BRITISH, AMERICAN or

daylight robbery

BRITISH
You use highway robbery or daylight robbery to describe a situation in which you are charged far too much money for something. They're charging ten bucks for the comics, which sounds like highway robbery to us. You have to pay thousands of dollars for the service. It's daylight robbery!
See also: highway, robbery

ˌhighways and ˈbyways

(on/along) all the roads, large and small, of a country, an area, etc: She travelled the highways and byways of Scotland collecting folk songs and local traditions.
A byway is a small road.
See also: and, highway

ˌmy way or the ˈhighway

(American English, informal) used to say that somebody else has either to agree with your opinion or to leave: Right now there is only one rule here. It’s my way or the highway.
See also: highway, way

as hot as highway blacktop

Scorching. A typical summer day in the Deep South.
See also: highway, hot
References in classic literature ?
On another day as they were biding in a deserted hovel to escape the notice of a caravan of merchants journeying up-country with their wares, they saw a band of ruffians rush out from the concealing shelter of some bushes at the far side of the highway and fall upon the surprised and defenseless tradesmen.
It was all too true to be disputed, and the unlucky man had to pocket his wrath with the best grace he was able, and all three faced to the right about, and took up their line of march for the highway.
The village is the place to which the roads tend, a sort of expansion of the highway, as a lake of a river.
Go out into the King's Highway and search until you find a cottage and a heavy plough leaning against a tree near by.
They quickly provided themselves with a deer and made great preparations to cook it over a small fire, when a little dust was seen blowing along the highway, and out of it came the portly Bishop cantering along with ten men-at-arms at his heels.
The bushes which lined the highway interrupted the view, and the two sleighs were close upon each other before either was seen.
A clamber over the hill into the adjoining vale brought him to the fence of a highway whose contours he recognized, which settled the question of their whereabouts.
Then, like a battering-ram, one of the powerful hind legs caught me full in the chest and hurled me, half stunned and wholly winded, clear across the broad highway and into the underbrush of the jungle that fringes it.
You cross the ten-acre lot, follow the lane to the highway, go north to the five branches, and take--let me see--"
Take THAT road," said the Wise-Looking Person, pointing it out; "it is known as the Political Highway.
There had been frost during the night, and the white hard road rang loud under their horses' irons as they spurred through the east gate of the town, along the same broad highway which the unknown French champion had traversed on the day of the jousts.
It was a fair highway, through the Land of Lost Delight; shadow and sunshine were blessedly mingled, and every turn and dip revealed a fresh charm and a new loveliness to eager hearts and unspoiled eyes.
If we could obtain permission from the Municipal Council to make a hard road, so as to put us in communication with the highway to Grenoble, the deputy-mayor would be the first gainer by it; for instead of dragging his timber over rough tracks at a great expense, a good road through the canton would enable him to transport it more easily, and to engage in a traffic on a large scale, in all kinds of wood, that would bring in money--not a miserable six hundred francs a year, but handsome sums which would mean a certain fortune for him some day.
Where now firm open fields stretch from the village to the woods, it then ran through a maple swamp on a foundation of logs, the remnants of which, doubtless, still underlie the present dusty highway, from the Stratton, now the Alms-House Farm, to Brister's Hill.
There they turned off to a little path leading to the high road to Epinay where we lost the traces in the newly macadamised highway.
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