have to

(redirected from Got To)
Also found in: Acronyms.

have to

Also, have got to. Be obliged to, must. For example, We have to go now, or He has got to finish the paper today. The use of have as an auxiliary verb to indicate obligation goes back to the 16th century; the variant using got dates from the mid-1800s.
See also: have
References in classic literature ?
Gradgrind greatly tormented his mind about what the people read in this library: a point whereon little rivers of tabular statements periodically flowed into the howling ocean of tabular statements, which no diver ever got to any depth in and came up sane.
Now," said Joe, getting up, "you got to let me kill YOU.
Tom, I reckon you've got to pack up and go down to Arkansaw--your aunt Sally wants you.
Well," he says, "I'm right down sorry, Aunt Polly, but I reckon I got to be excused--for the present.
The school teacher seen a round brown mole the size of a dime on his left leg above his knee, and four little bits of moles around it, when he was naked, and he said it minded him of Jubiter and his moons; and the children thought it was funny, and so they got to calling him Jubiter, and he's Jubiter yet.
He got to robbing when he was nineteen or twenty, and they jailed him; but he broke jail and got away--up North here, somers.
I beg your pardon,' said Alice very humbly: `you had got to the fifth bend, I think?
He limped to the cars and got to Brown's, where he found that the boss had kept his place--that is, was willing to turn out into the snow the poor devil he had hired in the meantime.
Ona was quite certain that she would find her place gone, and was all unnerved when she finally got to Brown's, and found that the forelady herself had failed to come, and was therefore compelled to be lenient.
That, Senor, is the place where the news has got to be conveyed without undue delay," he said in an agitated wheeze.
He could probably sue me for a lot because he's got the gnarly lawyer, but then it got to the point where we were just trying to work out this deal.
What if you got to do step aerobics instead of headstands on a balance for an A?
Instead, he got to watch brother Scot, 13, slide into a mushy ``sundae'' and pal Taylor Tolleson, 11, also of Palmdale, not only get slimed with green gunk, but become the lucky victim of a pie in the face.