go figure!

go figure

A phrase used to highlight that something is comical or ridiculous. The one time I get to the station on time, the train is delayed—go figure!
See also: figure

Go figure.

It's really strange.; Just try to figure it out. She says she wants to have a conversation, but when I try, she does all the talking. Go figure.
See also: figure

go figure

mainly AMERICAN, INFORMAL
People say go figure when they want you to consider something they have just said because it is surprising or interesting. The average wage is $23,000 but you would need to earn $31,000 to buy the typical first home. Go figure. When I interviewed her she seemed like a nice, normal girl. So is this scandal true? Go figure.
See also: figure

go figure!

work it out for yourself (used to suggest that the conclusion to be drawn about something is obvious). North American informal
1999 Massive In the last election, the Tories got 19 per cent of the votes in Scotland and have no MPs there at all, while the Lib Dems got 13 per cent and have 10 MPs. Go figure.

go ˈfigure

(American English, informal) used to say that you do not understand the reason for something, or that you do not want to give an explanation for something because you think it is obvious: At the same time that I was criticized for working too fast I was accused of working too slow. Go figure!
See also: figure

Go figure

interj. Try to figure it out.; Just try to explain that! They heat the water to make the tea hot, then they put ice in it to make it cold, then they put lemon in it to make it sour, and then they put sugar in it to make it sweet. Go figure.
See also: figure

go figure

Used in the imperative to indicate the unexpectedness or absurdity of something.
See also: figure