gas

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Related to Gass: Gauss, guess, Gauß

gasbag

A person who speaks at too great a length, saying little of value and often with an air of pretentious authority. Ah, quit prattling on about the government, you old gasbag! You don't know the first thing about politics.

have a gas

To have a thoroughly entertaining, enjoyable, and/or amusing time. I went out last night with all my old high school buddies for a night on the town. We had a gas! We were all having a gas at the party when the police showed up to tell us we were being too loud.
See also: gas, have

hit the gas

To move quickly; to accelerate or go faster. Used especially while riding in an automobile. We'll need to hit the gas if we want to make it to the movie on time.
See also: gas, hit

pour gas/gasoline on the fire

To do or say something to make an argument, problem, or bad situation worse; to further incense an already angry person or group of people. The debate was going poorly for the senatorial candidate, and his strikingly uncouth comments simply poured gasoline on the fire. Revelations of the CEO's massive retirement package poured gas on the fire for consumers already furious over the charity's dubious financial dealings.
See also: fire, gas, on, pour

gas guzzler

A vehicle that consumes more than the average amount of gasoline during normal usage. Every time the price of oil rises, people trade in their gas guzzlers for more fuel-efficient cars.
See also: gas, guzzler

be cooking on gas

slang To be making rapid progress or performing efficiently. Now that we've had this breakthrough with our experiment, we're really cooking on gas.
See also: cook, gas, on

gaslighting

The act of manipulating someone psychologically so that they begin to doubt their experience of reality. The phrase comes from the 1938 play Gas Light, in which the protagonist attempts to induce insanity in his wife by constantly questioning or doubting her reports of strange events, such as the dimming of the house's gas lights (which has in fact occurred and is related to the husband's nefarious activities). Her husband must be gaslighting her because she suddenly doubts all the evidence that she's found of his indiscretions. The administration has been accused of gaslighting with its repeated attempts to spread disinformation.

now (one's) cooking (with gas)

Now one is making progress or doing something right. That's how to do it, team! Now you're cooking with gas! Adjusting those parts made all the difference. Look how fast it goes! Now we're cooking!
See also: cook, now

cooking with gas

slang Having success in a particular activity. Once we dislodged that piece, we were really cooking with gas on this repair. That's a great idea—now you're cooking with gas!
See also: cook, gas

run out of gas

1. Literally, to near the end of one's supply of gas in a car or other vehicle. I'm running out of gas, so we need to stop before we get on the highway.
2. To lose one's energy or vitality for something. After spending hours working on this project, I'm running out of gas—can we take a break?
See also: gas, of, out, run

step on the gas

Move faster! (As if one is accelerating a car by stepping on the gas pedal.) Step on the gas, will you? We're going to be late!
See also: gas, on, step

gas up

To put gasoline into a vehicle. A noun or pronoun can be used between "gas" and "up." You should gas up before hitting the road—you'll never make it all the way there otherwise.
See also: gas, up

cooking with gas

doing [something] exactly right. That's great! Now you're cooking with gas! I knew she was finally cooking with gas when she answered all the questions correctly.
See also: cook, gas

gas something up

to put gasoline into a vehicle. I have to gas this car up soon. I will stop and gas up the car at the next little town.
See also: gas, up

gas up

to fill up one's gasoline tank with gasoline. I have to stop at the next service station and gas up. The next time you gas up, try some of the gasoline with alcohol in it.
See also: gas, up

*out of gas

 
1. Lit. without gasoline (in a car, truck, etc.). (*Typically: be ~; run ~.) We can't go any farther. We're out of gas. This car will be completely out of gas in a few more miles.
2. Fig. tired; exhausted; worn out. (*Typically: be ~; fun ~.) What a day! I've been working since morning, and I'm really out of gas. I think the old washing machine has finally run out of gas. I'll have to get a new one.
See also: gas, of, out

pass gas

Euph. to release intestinal gas through the anus. Someone on the bus had passed gas. It smelled awful. Something I ate at lunch made me pass gas all afternoon.
See also: gas, pass

run someone or something out of something

 and run someone or something out
to chase someone or something out of something or some place. The old man ran the kids out of his orchard. He ran out the kids.
See also: of, out, run

run something out of something

 and run something out
to drive or steer something out of something or some place. The cowboys ran the cattle out of the corral. They ran out the cattle.
See also: of, out, run

step on the gas

 and step on it
to hurry up; to make a vehicle go faster. (As if stepping on an automobile's accelerator. step on the gas. We are going to be late! step on it! Let's go!
See also: gas, on, step

cook with gas

Also, cook on the front burner. Do very well, make rapid progress. For example, The first half is finished already? Now you're cooking with gas, or Two promotions in two years-she's really cooking on the front burner! The first of these metaphoric phrases alludes to gas stoves, which began to replace slower wood-burning stoves about 1915. The variant, which alludes to something on a stove's front burner receiving more attention, is heard less often today. [Slang; 1940s] Also see back burner.
See also: cook, gas

gas up

Supply a vehicle with gasoline, as in I want to be sure to gas up before we go. James M. Cain used this term in The Postman Always Rings Twice (1934): "I went to gas up a car." [Colloquial; c. 1930 Also see tank up.
See also: gas, up

out of gas

see under run out of.
See also: gas, of, out

run out of

Exhaust a supply or quantity of, as in We're about to run out of coffee and sugar. This expression, dating from about 1700, can be used both literally and figuratively. Thus run out of gas may mean one no longer has any fuel, but it has also acquired the figurative sense of exhausting a supply of energy, enthusiasm, or support, and hence causing some activity to come to a halt. For example, After running ten laps I ran out of gas and had to rest to catch my breath, or The economic recovery seems to have run out of gas. On the other hand, run out of steam, originally alluding to a steam engine, today is used only figuratively to indicate a depletion of energy of any kind.
See also: of, out, run

run out of gas

mainly AMERICAN
If you run out of gas, you suddenly feel tired and lose energy or interest in what you are doing, and so you stop or fail. Miller, who missed second place by four seconds, said she `ran out of gas' close to the finish. The government's plan has run out of gas. Compare with run out of steam. Note: The image here is of a car stopping because it has run out of gas, or, in British English, petrol.
See also: gas, of, out, run

all gas and gaiters

a satisfactory state of affairs. informal, dated
This expression was first recorded in Charles Dickens' Nicholas Nickleby ( 1839 ): ‘All is gas and gaiters’.
1961 P. G. Wodehouse Ice in the Bedroom She cries ‘Oh, Freddie darling!’ and flings herself into his arms, and all is gas and gaiters again.
See also: all, and, gas

run out of gas

run out of energy; lose momentum. North American informal
See also: gas, of, out, run

step on the gas

press on the accelerator to make a car go faster. North American informal
See also: gas, on, step

be cooking with ˈgas

(American English, informal) be doing something very well and successfully: Business may have been a little slow at first, but now we’re cooking with gas!
See also: cook, gas

gas up

v.
1. To supply gasoline or fuel to a vehicle: The tank was almost empty, so we stopped at a service station and gassed up.
2. To supply some vehicle or machine with gasoline or fuel: We gassed up the car before the road trip. After fixing the lawn mower, I gassed it up and tried to start it.
See also: gas, up

cooking with gas

in. doing exactly right. (Always with -ing.) That’s great! Now you’re cooking with gas!
See also: cook, gas

gas

1. n. intestinal gas. The baby has gas and will cry for a while longer.
2. n. nonsense. Hey, that’s about enough of your gas.
3. in. to talk nonsense; to brag. (see also gasbag.) Stop gassing for a minute and listen.
4. in. to have a good time. We gassed all evening.
5. and gasser n. a joke; a prank; a wild time. What a gas! I had a great time.
6. n. liquor, especially inferior liquor. Pour me a little more of that gas, will you?
7. and gas up in. to drink excessively; to get drunk. I come home every night and find that you’ve been gassing all day. He gassed up for a couple of hours while waiting for the plane.

gas up

verb
See gas
See also: gas, up

gasbag

n. a braggart. What’s the old gasbag going on about now?

gas-guzzler

n. a large automobile that uses much gasoline. The old gas-guzzlers were certainly comfortable.

gas-passer

n. a jocular nickname for an anesthetist. (Hospitals.) My gosh! The gas-passer charged almost as much as the surgeon.

run out of gas

in. to lose momentum or interest. I hope I don’t run out of gas before I finish what I set out to do.
See also: gas, of, out, run

take the pipe

1. and take the gas pipe tv. to commit suicide. (Originally by inhaling gas.) The kid was dropping everything in sight and finally took the pipe.
2. tv. to fail to perform under pressure; to cave in. (From sense 1) Don’t take the pipe, man. Stick in there!
See also: pipe, take

take the gas pipe

verb
See also: gas, pipe, take
References in periodicals archive ?
Gass points to a coffee cup in his office in which staffers from each of the former companies who used the term "us" or "they" had to plunk down $5 as a fine.
That quest leads to many more tedious moments involving gas and hash (and a pretty funny cheeseball dream sequence featuring Black, the aforementioned mushrooms and Bigfoot), culminating in the movie's other showstopping sequence, a heavy-metal riff on Charlie Daniels' ``The Devil Went Down to Georgia.
Gass mixes biography and criticism, specific analyses and speculative generalizations, with considerable dexterity.
Staying in a bed-and-breakfast in Illinois, Walter Riff finds it a veritable museum of all kinds of pedestrian objets d'art that Gass details with infinite care.
Combining with Dionne & Gass accomplishes those goals on both fronts.
The school intends GrE-ningen on the existing school system Except Gass to realize a new school building.
United Kingdom's head of the Foreign Office's political unit Simon Gass and Iranian Deputy Foreign Minister for legal and international affairs Seyed Abbas Araqchi, in a meeting in TehranEe on Monday, discussed Iran's peaceful nuclear program and the upcoming talks between Tehran and the six major world powers.
KEEPJ YOUR FOOT ON THE GASS Darren Gass at last year's Lurgan Park Rally RUSHJ HOUR Jenny Curran and Kenny McKinstry gear up for Orchard Motorsport Lurgan Park Rally Preview Spectacular at Rushmere Shopping Centre, this Saturday
Memorial Observance will be held through Tuesday Evening, April 5th and Wednesday afternoon through Wednesday Evening, April 6th at the residence of Robert and Sandra Gass.
announced here Wednesday his decision to appoint British diplomat Simon Gass
Tenacious D's Kyle Gass will be at Luckey's melting faces Thursday with his band of scorchin' musicians.
Michael Gass, CEO of United Launch Alliance, on the prospect of space tourism in his lifetime.
Kyle: We're hoping for some this tour,'' Gass says.
Aside from being a great novelist, Gass is arguably the smartest and most stylistically perceptive American essayist alive today.
Gass and Priest (1997) further identified the benefits of participating in facilitated adventure activities as--the development of new confidence in oneself, increase in logical reasoning skills, increase in shared decision-making, and improvement in problem-solving skills.