gate

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crash the gate

To attend an event, such as a concert, sports match, or party, without being invited or paying to get in. That's way too much money to see them in concert, let's just crash the gate and see them on the sly! There's always a few who crash the gate at my party and end up causing trouble.
See also: crash, gate

gatecrasher

One who attends an event, such as a concert, sports match, or party, without being invited or paying to get in. I don't mind gatecrashers coming to my parties, so long as they behave themselves. Due to the popularity of the show—and the limited amount of tickets—extra security was hired to keep any gatecrashers out of the concert.

like a bull at a gate

Very quickly and rashly; hastily, without careful thinking or planning. I only have a few hours before this essay is due, so I'm going at it like a bull at a gate. With only a few seconds left in the match, he started charging at his opponent like a bull at a gate out of desperation.
See also: bull, gate, like

out (of) the (starting) gate

Immediately; at or from the very starting position. Out the gate, the company's latest video game console has proven wildly popular. We're aiming to be the first one out of the gate with mixed-reality technology. I was a bit slow out of the starting gate to find what I wanted to study in college, but by my second year I felt really confident in my degree.
See also: gate, out

the pearly gates

The gates of heaven. The phrase originates from a passage about heaven in the book of Revelation. Sometimes capitalized. When I get to the pearly gates, I want Saint Peter to say, "Now the party can begin!"
See also: gate, pearly

creaking door hangs longest

 and creaking gate hangs longest
Prov. Sickly people often live longer than healthy ones. Jill: I'm worried that my grandmother may not live much longer. She's been sick for so many years. Jane: Well, if it's any comfort, I've heard that a creaking door hangs longest.
See also: creak, door, hang, long

get the gate

Inf. to be sent away; to be rejected. I thought he liked me, but I got the gate. I was afraid I'd get the gate, and I was right.
See also: gate, get

give someone the gate

Sl. to get rid of someone. The chick was a pest, so I gave her the gate. He threatened to give me the gate, so I left.
See also: gate, give

crash the gate

Gain admittance, as to a party or concert, without being invited or without paying. For example, The concert was outdoors, but heavy security prevented anyone from crashing the gate. This term originally applied to persons getting through the gate at sports events without buying tickets. By the 1920s it was extended to being an uninvited guest at other gatherings and had given rise to the noun gatecrasher for one who did so. [Early 1900s]
See also: crash, gate

give someone the air

Also, give someone the brush off or the gate or the old heave-ho . Break off relations with someone, oust someone, snub or jilt someone, especially a lover. For example, John was really upset when Mary gave him the air, or His old friends gave him the brush off, or Mary cried and cried when he gave her the gate, or The company gave him the old heave-ho after only a month. In the first expression, which dates from about 1920, giving air presumably alludes to being blown out. The second, from the first half of the 1900s, alludes to brushing away dust or lint. The third, from about 1900, uses gate in the sense of "an exit." The fourth alludes to the act of heaving a person out, and is sometimes used to mean "to fire someone from a job" (see get the ax). All these are colloquialisms, and all have variations using get, get the air (etc.), meaning "to be snubbed or told to leave," as in After he got the brush off, he didn't know what to do.
See also: air, give

get the gate

AMERICAN
If someone gets the gate, they are sent away or told that they are not wanted. He was replaced for a time by the respected Emanuel Steward, who also eventually got the gate. Note: You can also say that someone is given the gate. Both competitors were given the gate for breaking the rules.
See also: gate, get

like a bull at a gate

hastily and without thought.
See also: bull, gate, like

get (or be given) the gate

be dismissed from a job. North American informal
See also: gate, get

the ˌPearly ˈGates

(humorous) the gates of heaven: What’s going to happen when I get to those Pearly Gates? Have I lead a good life?
See also: Gate, pearly

the gate

n. a forced exit; sending (someone) away. (see also give someone the gate.) I could see in his eyes that it was the gate for me.
See also: gate

give someone the gate

tv. to get rid of someone. The chick was a pest, so I gave her the gate.
See also: gate, give

get the gate

Slang
To be dismissed or rejected.
See also: gate, get

give (someone) the gate

Slang
1. To discharge from a job.
2. To reject or jilt.
See also: gate, give