fry

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have other fish to fry

To have more important or more interesting things to do or attend to. I hope the boss keeps this meeting short—we all have other fish to fry.
See also: fish, fry, have, other

bigger fish to fry

More important matters to deal with. I can't worry about that now, I've got bigger fish to fry! I want Chris to help me with this project, but he claims he has bigger fish to fry right now.
See also: big, fish, fry

fish to fry

Matters to deal with. Often used in the phrases "bigger fish to fry" or "other fish to fry." I can't deal with this right now, I've got other fish to fry! Susie did bring me the latest report, but I've got bigger fish to fry at the moment.
See also: fish, fry

fry the fat out of

To get money out of someone through violence and/or extortion. If you don't pay up, I'll have my men fry the fat out of you, don't you worry. It's time to fry the fat out of you, Stan, because I always get my money, one way or another.
See also: fat, fry, of, out

have bigger fish to fry

To have more important or more interesting things to do or attend to. It's really not worth my time; I've got bigger fish to fry! I want Chris to help me with this project, but he claims he has bigger fish to fry right now.
See also: big, fish, fry, have

out of the frying pan (and) into the fire

From a bad, stressful, or dangerous situation into one that is even worse. If you use credit cards to pay off a debt, you're jumping out of the frying pan into the fire. I thought moving up to the manager's position, I'd have an easier time in the restaurant, but I went out of the frying pan and into the fire!
See also: fire, fry, of, out, pan

fry something up

to cook something by frying. Let's fry some chicken up for dinner. We fried up some chicken.
See also: fry, up

Go chase yourself!

 and Go climb a tree!; Go fly a kite!; Go jump in the lake!
Inf. Go away and stop bothering me! Bob: Get out of here. Bill! You're driving mecrazy! Go chase yourself'. Bill: What did I do to you? Bob: You're just in the way. Bill: Dad, can I have ten bucks? Father: Go climb a tree! Fred: Stop pestering me, John. Go jump in the lake! John: What did I do? Bob: Well, Bill, don't you owe me some money? Bill: Go fly a kite!
See also: chase

Go fry an egg!

Go away and stop bothering me! Go away and stop bothering me. Go fry an egg! Get out of my way! Go fry an egg!
See also: fry

have bigger fish to fry

 and have other fish to fry; have more important fish to fry
Fig. to have other things to do; to have more important things to do. I can't take time for your problem. I have other fish to fry. I won't waste time on your question. I have bigger fish to fry.
See also: big, fish, fry, have

language that would fry bacon

Rur. profanity; swearing; curse words. ("Hot" language.) He carried on in language that would fry bacon. I was shocked when I heard that sweet little girl use language that would fry bacon.
See also: bacon, fry, language, that

*out of the frying pan (and) into the fire

Fig. from a bad situation to a worse situation. (*Typically: get ~; go ~; jump ~.) When I tried to argue about my fine for a traffic violation, the judge charged me with contempt of court. I really went out of the frying pan into the fire. I got deeply in debt. Then I really got out of the frying pan into the fire when I lost my job.
See also: fire, fry, of, out, pan

small fry

 
1. Lit. newly hatched fish; small, juvenile fish. The catch was bad today. Nothing but small fry.
2. Fig. unimportant people. The police have only caught the small fry. The leader of the gang is still free. You people are just small fry! I want to talk to the boss.
3. Fig. children. Peter's taking the small fry to the zoo. We should take the small fry to the pantomime.
See also: fry, small

other fish to fry

Also, better or bigger fish to fry . More important matters to attend to, as in They asked me to help with the decorations, but I have other fish to fry. [Mid-1500s]
See also: fish, fry, other

out of the frying pan into the fire

From a bad situation to one that is much worse. For example, After Karen quit the first law firm she went to one with even longer hours-out of the frying pan into the fire . This expression, a proverb in many languages, was first recorded in English in 1528.
See also: fire, fry, of, out, pan

small fry

1. Young children, as in This show is not suitable for small fry.
2. Persons of little importance or influence, as in She wasn't about to invite the Washington small fry to the reception. Both usages allude to fry in the sense of "young or small fish." [Late 1800s]
See also: fry, small

stew in one's own juice

Suffer the consequences of one's actions, as in He's run into debt again, but this time we're leaving him to stew in his own juice. This metaphoric term alludes to cooking something in its own liquid. Versions of it, such as fry in one's own grease, date from Chaucer's time, but the present term dates from the second half of the 1800s.
See also: juice, own, stew

have other fish to fry

or

have bigger fish to fry

If you have other fish to fry or have bigger fish to fry, you have something more important, interesting, or profitable to do. I didn't pursue it in detail because I'm afraid I had other fish to fry at the time. She tried to avoid wasting time on bureaucratic squabbling. She had bigger fish to fry. Note: This phrase is often varied. For example, if someone has their own fish to fry, they are not interested in doing something because they have business of their own to deal with. Tony comes and goes. He's got his own fish to fry, as they say.
See also: fish, fry, have, other

out of the frying pan into the fire

or

from the frying pan into the fire

If someone has gone out of the frying pan into the fire or from the frying pan into the fire, they have moved from a bad situation to an even worse one. I was hoping to get my career back on track after a bad time at Villa. But as it turned out, I'd gone out of the frying pan into the fire. Having finally left one bad relationship, she jumped from the frying pan into the fire.
See also: fire, fry, of, out, pan

have other (or bigger) fish to fry

have other or more important matters to attend to.
1985 Gregory Benford Artifact Kontos can throw a fit back there, chew the rug, anything—it won't matter. His government has bigger fish to fry.
See also: fish, fry, have, other

out of the frying pan into the fire

from a bad situation to one that is worse.
See also: fire, fry, of, out, pan

have other/bigger fish to ˈfry

(informal) have more important, interesting or useful things to do: He’s not interested in reviewing small provincial exhibitions like this one; he’s got much bigger fish to fry.So you aren’t coming out with us tonight? I suppose you’ve got other fish to fry.
See also: big, fish, fry, have, other

out of the ˈfrying pan (and) into the ˈfire

(saying) out of one situation of danger or difficulty into another (usually worse) one: It was a case of out of the frying pan into the fire: she divorced her husband, who was an alcoholic, and then married another man with the same problem.
See also: fire, fry, of, out, pan

ˈsmall fry

(informal) people, groups or businesses that are not considered to be important or powerful: These local companies are only small fry compared to the huge multinationals. OPPOSITE: a big name/noise/shot
See also: fry, small

fry up

v.
To prepare or make something by frying: I'll fry up some pancakes for breakfast. They fried some bacon up for the sandwiches.
See also: fry, up

fry

1. in. to die in the electric chair. (Underworld.) The DA is determined that you will fry.
2. tv. to execute someone in the electric chair. (Underworld.) They’re gonna fry you for this.

Go chase yourself!

and Go chase your tail! and Go climb a tree! and Go fly a kite! and Go fry an egg! and Go jump in the lake! and Go soak your head! and Go soak yourself!
exclam. Beat it!; Go away! Oh, go chase yourself! Go soak your head! You’re a pain in the neck.
See also: chase

Go fry an egg!

verb
See also: fry

small fry

1. n. anything or anyone small or unimportant. (Fry are juvenile fish.) Don’t worry about the small fry. You have to please the fat-cats.
2. n. small children. The small fries have eaten and are getting ready for bed.
See also: fry, small

other fish to fry

Informal
Other matters to attend to: He declined to come along to the movie, saying he had other fish to fry.
See also: fish, fry, other

better fish to fry

More important things to do. This way of saying that you don't want to waste your time with something (or someone) goes back to 17th-century England. Its French equivalent is “other dogs to whip.” Variations are “other fish to fry” and “better fish to fry.”
See also: better, fish, fry