fringe benefit

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fringe benefit

A non-monetary perk, incentive, or benefit for working a job that is given in addition to one's normal wage or salary. One of the fringe benefits of working here is getting free lunch in the cafeteria.
See also: benefit, fringe
References in periodicals archive ?
8226; Review what special fringe benefits that the IRS consider non-taxable benefits
C corporation stockholders who are also employees generally are entitled to the same tax-free fringe benefits as other employees.
The following are not excludable as de minimis fringe benefits (Regs.
The new WageWorks division will do business as Fringe Benefits Management Company, a Division of WageWorks, and will remain headquartered in Tallahassee, Florida.
It is uncertain whether its existence has restrained the development of new forms of nonstatutory fringe benefits.
44 euros an hour, with fringe benefits accounting for 28%.
61-21(g) contains the fringe benefit rules and methodology for valuing non-commercial flights on employer-provided aircraft.
Given equal productivity, workers would trade fringe benefits for higher wages and vice versa.
Like many other fringe benefits, therefore, it was contextually linked to wage setting.
Hardest hit among such fringe benefits were partial corporate allowances for employees' housing rents and rents for company built or maintained housing leased to employees, the federation said in an annual survey.
Fringe benefits accumulate and a return to the previous job or equivalent is guaranteed.
Providing competitive fringe benefits, ranging from retirement plans to long-term care insurance, is one answer, several members of the Financial Planning Association, Denver, Colo.
In determining the taxability or nontaxability of fringe benefits, the starting place is Internal Revenue Code Section 61.
We know that, as an industry, we have spent millions of dollars for staff training, and have created personnel policy handbooks setting forth often very generous fringe benefits (costing employers up to $5,000 per employee) -- and yet are still faced, as we were in the 1980s, with high turnover, inconsistent productivity and what might be described as lagging group dynamics.
1) The proportion of total remunerations which make up fringe benefits is influenced by preferential treatment under income tax laws.