French leave


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Related to French leave: French kiss

French leave

  (old-fashioned, humorous)
a period when you are absent from work without asking for permission
Usage notes: In the 18th century in France, it was the custom to leave an official event or party without saying goodbye to the person who had invited you.
Is Ray really ill again, or is he just taking French leave?
See Pardon my French!
See also: french, leave

French leave

To leave without saying good-bye. The British thought that sneaking away from a gathering without telling anyone you're going wasn't acceptable manners across the channel. Curiously, or perhaps typically, the French refer to the same practice as filer a` l'anglais (“take English leave”). Americans used to use the phrase without knowing its origin. It has been said that the French leave but never say good-bye, while Americans say good-bye but never leave. “French leave” is also military slang for deserting.
See also: french, leave
References in periodicals archive ?
To coincide with the scheduled programming of French Leave, Bonne Maman is offering consumers the opportunity to 'win their own French Leave' in a nation-wide on-pack competition.
French Leave, Fidelma Cook, Macdonald Media Publishing, pounds 9.
Olivier bernard has headed off for a spot of French leave ( and a spot of French treatment.
FRENCH Leave,by John Burton Race, is published by Ebury Press, priced pounds 20 and is available now.
Top-selling conserve Bonne Maman is to show off its French roots by sponsoring a new Channel 4 documentary series called French Leave, its first foray onto British TV.
Byline: Journalist and author of the book French Leave COMMENT By FIDELMA COOK
MARK HUGHES has urged Joey Barton to take French leave with a year-long loan from QPR at Marseille.
FRENCH LEAVE Barton is joining Marseille for a season