French leave


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Related to French leave: French kiss

French leave

1. An absence or departure from some place or event without ceremony, permission, or announcement. The official story is that he's sick, but I think he's just taking French leave. As the evening wore on, we decided to just take French leave and make our way home.
2. In the military, desertion of one's unit. The sergeant is facing a court martial after it was discovered that he'd taken French leave just before the deadly operation.
See also: french, leave

French leave

To leave without saying good-bye. The British thought that sneaking away from a gathering without telling anyone you're going wasn't acceptable manners across the channel. Curiously, or perhaps typically, the French refer to the same practice as filer a` l'anglais (“take English leave”). Americans used to use the phrase without knowing its origin. It has been said that the French leave but never say good-bye, while Americans say good-bye but never leave. “French leave” is also military slang for deserting.
See also: french, leave
References in periodicals archive ?
The ups and downs of the jumping game were agonisingly illustrated by Victor Dartnall, as the Devon trainer saddled a double with Dancing Mist and French Leave but in-between lost the promising King Billy, who had to be put down after pulling up lame.
French Leave, Fidelma Cook, Macdonald Media Publishing, pounds 9.
FRENCH Leave,by John Burton Race, is published by Ebury Press, priced pounds 20 and is available now.
Byline: Journalist and author of the book French Leave COMMENT By FIDELMA COOK
MARK HUGHES has urged Joey Barton to take French leave with a year-long loan from QPR at Marseille.
FRENCH LEAVE Barton is joining Marseille for a season