freedom

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Related to Freedoms: five freedoms

freedom of speech

The right to express one's opinion without censorship or other forms of punishment imposed by the government. In the United States, freedom of speech is protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution. The editor does not want to print my controversial article, but I'm pushing for it to appear in the next issue—what about freedom of speech?
See also: freedom, of, speech

give one one's freedom

to set someone free; to divorce someone. Mrs. Brown wanted to give her husband his freedom. Well, Tom, I hate to break it to you this way, but I have decided to give you your freedom.
See also: freedom, give, one

*(a) right to do something

 and *(the) right to do something
the freedom to do something; the legal or moral permission or license to do something. (*Typically: get ~; have ~; You don't have the right to enter my home without my permission. I have a right to grow anything I want on my farmland.
See also: right
References in classic literature ?
Delightful work may be produced under burlesque and farcical conditions, and in work of this kind the artist in England is allowed very great freedom.
In the long history of the world, only a few generations have been granted the role of defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger; I do not shrink from this responsibility.
You must not think that there is no integrity and honor except among those who stood up for the freedom of America.
Thus Achilles, in Homer, complains of Agamemnon's treating him like an unhonoured stranger; for a stranger or sojourner is one who does not partake of the honours of the state: and whenever the right to the freedom of the city is kept obscure, it is for the sake of the inhabitants.
You know, there are two good things in life, freedom of thought and freedom of action.
Even the most ignorant members of my race on the remote plantations felt in their hearts, with a certainty that admitted of no doubt, that the freedom of the slaves would be the one great result of the war, if the northern armies conquered.
Various obscure rumors were always current among them: at one time a rumor that they would all be enrolled as Cossacks; at another of a new religion to which they were all to be converted; then of some proclamation of the Tsar's and of an oath to the Tsar Paul in 1797 (in connection with which it was rumored that freedom had been granted them but the landowners had stopped it), then of Peter Fedorovich's return to the throne in seven years' time, when everything would be made free and so "simple" that there would be no restrictions.
We live in freedom, but you bow down to and slave for men, who in return for your services flog you with whips and put collars on your necks.
He promptly sent for the Adversary of Souls and demanded his freedom, explaining that he was entirely orthodox, and had always led a pious and holy life.
Freedom they had ever loved, and freedom they would have.
Freedom from the domination of the great tradition could only be found by seeking new subjects, and such freedom was really only illusionary, since romantic subjects alone are suitable for epic treatment.
Man has no power whatever unless he has unlimited freedom of action.
And so the young man passes out of his original nature, which was trained in the school of necessity, into the freedom and libertinism of useless and unnecessary pleasures.
This brought to our heroe's mind the custom which he had read of among the Greeks and Romans, of indulging, on certain festivals and solemn occasions, the liberty to slaves, of using an uncontrouled freedom of speech towards their masters.
But in the loneliest wilderness happeneth the second metamorphosis: here the spirit becometh a lion; freedom will it capture, and lordship in its own wilderness.