fold

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Related to Foldes: Folders, folds

fold (up) (one's) tent

To quit, withdraw, or disengage (from something), especially quietly or discreetly. After allegations of embezzlement, the CEO decided to fold his tent and take an early retirement. You're going to have a lot of setbacks in life, so don't just fold up your tent and go home at the first sign of failure.
See also: fold, tent

green folding stuff/money

Paper money, especially in large amounts. Primarily heard in US. Boy, I bet you had to lay down some serious green folding for that new sports car, huh? How much green folding stuff is this repair job gonna cost me? Now, don't go shelling out all your green folding money at once just because you've gotten your first paycheck.
See also: fold, green, money, stuff

fold back

[for a sheet of something] to bend back. The cloth folded back, revealing the faded upholstery below. The top page folded back, revealing a neatly typed manuscript.
See also: back, fold

fold one's hands

to bring one's hands together, palm to palm, with the fingers interlocking; to grasp one's hands together, palm to palm, perpendicular to one another. Please fold your hands and put them on the table while the teacher reads you a story. Please fold your hands and be quiet.
See also: fold, hand

fold something away

to fold something up and put it away. Please fold the maps away. Please fold away the maps neatly.
See also: away, fold

fold something back

to bend a sheet or flap of something back. She very carefully folded the page back to mark her place in the book. She folded back the page to mark her place in the book. The surgeon folded the flap of skin back, revealing the torn ligament.
See also: back, fold

fold something into something

 
1. and fold something in to blend something, such as eggs, into batter. (See also cut something into something.) Carefully, the chef folded the eggs into the other ingredients. The chef folded in the eggs.
2. to make an object by folding something, such as paper or cloth. He folded the paper into a little bird. Wally can fold a sheet of paper into an airplane that flies.
See also: fold

fold something over

to double something over on itself; to make a fold in something. I folded the paper over twice to make something I could fan myself with. Fold over each sheet, and then place it on the stack.
See also: fold

fold something up

 
1. Lit. to double something over into its original folded position. Please fold the paper up when you are finished. Please fold up the paper.
2. Fig. to put an end to something; to close a money-losing enterprise. Mr. Jones was going broke, so he folded his business up. The producer decided to fold up the play early. It was losing money.
See also: fold, up

fold, spindle, or mutilate

to harm or disfigure. Referring to a once-standard line printed on machine-readable documents, such as computer punch cards. (Such a document, if folded, placed on a bill spike, or otherwise punctured, would no longer be machine-readable.) At the bottom of the bill, it said "do not fold, spindle, or mutilate," and Jane, in her anger, did all three. Look here, chum, if you don't want to get folded, spindled, or mutilated, you had better do what you are told!

fold up

 
1. Lit. [for something] to close by folding. The table just folded up with no warning, trapping my leg.
2. Fig. [for someone] to faint. She folded up when she heard the news. I was so weak that I was afraid I was going to fold up.
3. Fig. [for a business] to cease operating. Our shop finally folded up because of the recession. Tom's little candy shop folded up.
See also: fold, up

folding money

bills of various dollar denominations. I don't want a check. Give me folding money! You got any folding money with you?
See also: fold, money

fold one's tent

Quietly depart, as in It's late, so let's fold our tents. This term is a partial quotation of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's poem "The Day is Done" (1844): "And the night shall be filled with music, And the cares that infest the day, Shall fold their tents, like the Arabs, And quietly steal away."
See also: fold, tent

fold up

1. Fail, especially go out of business. For example, Three stores on Main Street have folded up.
2. Collapse, break down. For example, When she told him about the dog's death, she folded up. This idiom alludes to closing or bringing an object into more compact form. [Early 1900s]
See also: fold, up

return to the fold

Come back to a group after an absence, as in Matthew taught for a number of years, but now he's returned to the fold as vice-president of the firm . This term employs fold in the sense of "an enclosure for sheep," which has been used figuratively since the first half of the 1300s.
See also: fold, return

fold up

v.
1. To bend or fold something so that it is closed or made compact: My roommate folded the letter up. Fold up that box and put it away.
2. To be able to be bent or folded to become closed or made compact: This table folds up so you can put it in the trunk of a small car.
3. To go out of business: Three of my favorite stores on this street folded up last summer.
See also: fold, up

fold

1. in. to fail; to close. I was afraid my business would fold because of the recession.
2. in. to collapse from drinking. Dave had just one more drink, and then he folded.

folded

mod. alcohol intoxicated. Pete is folded. That’s the third time this week.
See also: fold

folding money

and folding stuff
n. U.S. paper bank notes, as opposed to coins. All I got is change—no folding stuff. Sorry, I don’t have any folding money with me. Can you pick up the bill?
See also: fold, money

folding stuff

verb
See also: fold, stuff

green

and green folding and green paper and green stuff
n. money; paper money. (see also long bread.) I have so much green stuff, I don’t know what to do with it. What is need is more green! Not promises!

green folding

verb
See green
See also: fold, green

Hold some, fold some

sent. to hold some of your stocks and sell some. (Securities markets.) My best advice right now is to hold some, fold some. There is no real trend to the market.
See also: fold, hold

green

around/about the gills
Pale or sickly in appearance.

fold like a cheap suitcase

Collapse easily. Expensive luggage was made, as now, from well-constructed leather or fabric. Cheap ones used to be made of cardboard with little or no structural reinforcement, not very sturdy especially when manhandled by baggage handlers or hotel porters. A sports team with no defense or a poker player with a losing hand would both fold like a cheap suitcase. You'd also hear “fold like a cheap suit,” but since fabric folds easily, whether it's cashmere or polyester, “suitcase” presents a better connotation of a losing proposition.
See also: cheap, fold, like, suitcase
References in periodicals archive ?
Evensky & Katz Wealth Management and Foldes Financial Management merged earlier this year to create one of the largest independent registered investment advisors (RIAs) in South Florida, with approximately 4,100 accounts and $1.
Following the merger, Evensky & Katz / Foldes Financial selected Advisor View from Envestnet | Tamarac to increase interaction between advisors and clients, and position the firm to continue its long-term growth.
Competitive grants such as the CIHR POPII program provide important validation for the potential importance of this class of drug candidates, and represent a source of funding that is a life-line for start-up companies," said Robert Foldes, Viteava's founder and CEO.
Media Contact: Robert Foldes, Viteava Pharmaceuticals Inc.
Peter Foldes conducted a number of animation experiments and directed Hunger (1975) at the NFB using an early analog system to draw line characters.
Negotiating and executing this license agreement with multiple leading institutions was an important achievement and critical to advancing several exciting drug candidates discovered in the academic setting," said Robert Foldes, Viteava's founder and CEO.
Henning will explain the Foldes procedure on Friday, which will help spread the word until any FGM victim anywhere in the world can have it," she said.
Pierre Foldes, a French surgeon, it's now possible to repair what's left of the mutilated clitoris," Boisselier explained.
Pierre Foldes in France and published in a peer review journal, and that it is now practiced by many other surgeons trained by Foldes.
If you're a member of the media and would like to know if there are any Edy's Slow Churned Neighborhood Salute winners in your area, please contact: Sharon Foldes -- 415.
Foldes has nearly half-a-billion in assets under management (AUMs) Tom's approach is to invest 7-10% of AUMs in structured products, using them as a complement to core investment strategies.