Little Lord Fauntleroy

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Little Lord Fauntleroy

An effete and spoiled goody-two-shoes young man. The youngster was the title character of the 19th-century novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett. He lived in New York City with his mother, the daughter of a British lord who had eloped to the States against the wishes of her father. Summoned to England, the lad wins over his grandfather's cold heart through his innate goodness and good sense and becomes heir to the title. Although the title character was not at all spoiled or sissified, his hairstyle and clothing certainly gave that impression. That's why generations of privileged actual or supposed effete spoiled brats were taunted by sneers of “Look—here comes Little Lord Fauntleroy!”
See also: little, lord
References in periodicals archive ?
Mais lorsque le second heritier Dorincourt meurt, le petit Cedric est amene en Angleterre pour devenir Lord Fauntleroy.
Although she married and had two sons (one of whom donned, to his never-ending embarrassment, the famed velvet Lord Fauntleroy suit), Burnett claimed to loathe marriage in an era that idealized domesticity.
As a six-year-old, when this was my favourite book (no accounting for taste) Fauntleroy is pictured sitting on the back of a Great Dane.
We can still do this but we won't be doing it initially at the grandiose volume of up to 100 gigabyte submissions," Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Electronic Submissions Program Director Michael Fauntleroy said at the Institute for International Research Annual Conference on E-Submissions May 17.
He also makes sure that we don't see him until we meet him onstage, so we've all had a giggle at the Little Lord Fauntleroy look, the Pageboy, the Nutty Professor and the 'hair just out of a set of Carmen rollers' look.
Published in 1885, Burnett's Little Lord Fauntleroy found immediate success with both adults and children and received widespread critical acclaim.
Also, don't miss Leslea Newman's rhyming romp The Boy Who Cried Fabulous, perhaps the first book since Little Lord Fauntleroy to celebrate a queeny boy.
15) Little Lord Fauntleroy had fallen into disrepute and the "bad boy" of the Victorian storybook was resurrected as a "regular" or "real" boy by the turn of the century.
Self-deprecating, boyishly nervous, Maddin punctuated his thoughts on cowardice, artistic influence, and the revival of melodrama with the occasional fusty Fauntleroy phrase, enough to remind us that, chez Maddin, artifice is all.
and Canada, performed under the direction of Cimarosa authority Talmage Fauntleroy, along with local Italian chamber musicians and technicians, in a production that honored period conventions but took the liberties built into the genre, thus bringing Cimarosa's farce to life and filling in his sketchy outlines with genuine fun.
She is not only to the right of Genghis Kahn and Attila the Hun, but she makes both of them look like Little Lord Fauntleroy.
American architecture is composed, in the hundred, of ninety parts aberration, eight parts indifference, one part poverty, and one part Little Lord Fauntleroy.
American playwright and author who wrote the popular novel Little Lord Fauntleroy.
Krassner's conscious life, as he tells it, began when he was performing a solo violin concerto at the age of six, the youngest musician ever to give a concert at Carnegie Hall: "I was wearing a Little Lord Fauntleroy suit - ruffled white silk shirt with puffy sleeves, black velvet short pants with ivory buttons and matching vest - white socks and black patent-leather shoes.