eyelid

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bat an eyelid

To display a subtle emotional reaction, such as consternation, annoyance, sadness, joy, etc. Generally used in the negative to denote that the person in question did not display even a hint of an emotional response. Mary didn't even bat an eyelid when I told her I was moving out. That guy is dangerous. I heard he killed a man without batting an eyelid.
See also: bat, eyelid

hang by the eyelids

To have a loose grip on something. Can be used either literally or figuratively. For the tug-of-war, don't just hang by the eyelids, gentlemen! Really get a secure grip on the rope and keep a strong stance! I currently have a D in this class, but I'm just hanging by the eyelids—I really need to get a tutor.
See also: eyelid, hang

not bat an eyelid

To not display even a hint of an emotional response, such as consternation, annoyance, sadness, joy, etc. Mary didn't even bat an eyelid when I told her I was moving out. That guy is dangerous. I heard he killed a man without batting an eyelid.
See also: bat, eyelid, not

hang on

1. verb To physically hold something. Hang on tight so that you don't fall.
2. verb To suspend something from some surface or thing. We always hang our stockings on the mantle on Christmas Eve.
3. verb To wait. Often used an imperative. Hang on, I can't find my keys in my bag. A: "There's a customer waiting." B: "She'll just have to hang on a minute."
4. verb To try to assign responsibility for something to someone. Don't hang our lateness on me—I was actually ready on time!
5. verb To persist. I don't know how much longer I can hang on without a job.
6. verb To be dependent on someone or something. Whether or not I enjoy this weekend hangs on what the doctor tells me when he calls.
7. verb To keep something for someone. Can you hang on to my mail until I'm back in town?
8. verb To wait on the phone. Please hang on while I transfer your call.
See also: hang, on

hang on

 
1. to wait awhile. Hang on a minute. I need to talk to you. Hang on. Let me catch up with you.
2. to survive for awhile. I think we can hang on without electricity for a little while longer.
3. [for an illness] to linger or persist. This cold has been hanging on for a month. This is the kind of flu that hangs on for weeks.
4. be prepared for fast or rough movement. (Usually a command.) Hang on! The train is going very fast. Hang on! We're going to crash!
5. to pause in a telephone conversation. Please hang on until I get a pen. If you'll hang on, I'll get her.
See also: hang, on

hang on

(someone's) every word Cliché to listen closely or with awe to what someone says. I am hanging on your every word. Please go on. The audience hung on her every word throughout the speech.
See also: hang, on

hang on

 (to someone or something) and hold on (to someone or something)
1. Lit. to grasp someone or something. She hung on to her husband to keep warm. She sat there and hung on, trying to keep warm.
2. Fig. to detain someone or something. Please hang on to Tom if he's still there. I need to talk to him.
See also: hang, on

hang something on someone

Sl. to blame something on someone; to frame someone for something. (See also hang something on someone or something.) Don't try to hang the blame on me! The sheriff tried to hang the bank robbery on Jed.
See also: hang, on

hang something on someone or something

to drape or hook something on someone or something. (See also .) Hangthissign on Walter and see how he looks. Please hang this sign on the front door.
See also: hang, on

not bat an eyelid

 and not bat an eye
Fig. to show no signs of distress even when something bad happens or something shocking is said. Sam didn't bat an eyelid when the mechanic told him how much the car repairs would cost. The pain of the broken arm must have hurt Sally terribly, but she did not bat an eyelid.
See also: bat, eyelid, not

hang on

1. hang on to. Cling tightly to something, retain, as in Hang on to those papers before they blow away. [Mid-1800s] Also see hang on to your hat.
2. Continue persistently, persevere, as in This cough is hanging on much longer than I expected, or He was hanging on, hoping business would improve when interest rates went down. This usage was sometimes embellished to hang on by one's eyelashes or eyebrows or eyelids , meaning "to persist at any cost." [Second half of 1800s]
3. Keep a telephone connection open, as in Please hang on, I'll see if he's in. [First half of 1900s]
4. Wait for a short time, be patient, as in Hang on, I'm getting it as fast as I can. [First half of 1900s]
5. Depend on, as in Our plans hang on their decision about the new park. [Colloquial; second half of 1900s]
6. Blame on, as in They'll try to hang that robbery on the same gang, but I don't think they'll succeed. [Colloquial; first half of 1900s]
7. hang one on. Get very drunk, as in Come on, let's go and hang one on. [Slang; mid-1900s] Also see the subsequent idioms beginning with hang on.
See also: hang, on

not bat an eyelid

or

not bat an eyelash

mainly BRITISH
COMMON If someone does not bat an eyelid or does not bat an eyelash when something happens, they do not appear at all shocked or surprised by it. Even when told that a room in the hotel cost £235 per night, he didn't bat an eyelid. I thought Sarah would be embarrassed but she didn't bat an eyelid. This place could have burned to the ground, and he wouldn't have batted an eyelash. Note: You can also say that someone does something without batting an eyelid or without batting an eyelash. Mum would cater for a hundred people without batting an eyelid. Note: The usual American expression is not bat an eye.
See also: bat, eyelid, not

not bat an eyelid (or eye)

show no emotional or other reaction. informal
Bat in this sense is perhaps a dialect and US variant of the verb bate meaning ‘lower or let down’. The variant not blink an eye is also found.
1997 James Ryan Dismantling Mr Doyle She did not bat an eyelid when Eve spelled out the unorthodox details of the accommodation they required.
See also: bat, eyelid, not

not bat an ˈeyelid

(British English) (American English not bat an ˈeye) (informal) not seem surprised, worried, afraid, etc: She didn’t bat an eyelid when they told her she’d lost her job. She just calmly walked out.
See also: bat, eyelid, not

hang on

v.
1. To affix or mount something to some place or fixture that holds it and prevents it from falling: Please hang your hats on the hooks of the coat rack. I hung the picture on the wall.
2. To cling tightly to something: The cat hung on to the draperies until I was able to get it down.
3. To wait for a short period of time: Hang on, would you? I'll be there in a moment.
4. To continue persistently; persevere: The family is hanging on despite financial problems.
5. To depend on something or someone for an outcome: My whole future could hang on the results of this test.
6. To blame something on someone, especially unfairly: We lost the game, but you can't hang that on me.
See also: hang, on
References in periodicals archive ?
The device, Eyepeace (pictured right), is said to be the first personal eyelid massager designed to unblock the meibomian gland, and prevent and treat MGD.
4 If the object is under the upper eyelid, ask the person to pull the upper eyelid over the lower one as this can often dislodge the object.
The cotton thread is much less irritating to the corneal surface and eyelids than the filter paper strips used in the STT.
Plastic surgeon Alex Karidis believes Botox, eyelid surgery, fillers and ultrasound skinfirming treatments may be behind her new look.
It is visible usually only in the corner of the eye and it may be that you are seeing a prominent third eyelid.
Some Asian women believe this causes their eyelids droop too far, giving them the characteristic small Asian eye.
This was the 6th annual meeting directed only at oculoplastic surgery (cosmetic and reconstructive surgery focusing on the forehead/eyebrows, eyelids and midface).
1) Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients with an ulcerative lesion of the eyelids.
If the twitching involves both eyes, it is possible the sufferer has blepharospasm, a chronic condition which can develop into repeated forceful closing of the eyelids.
MOHAMED KHOULAIDI DOHA APPLICATION of black henna on the skin, eyelashes and eyelids will be banned from June 1.
of North Carolina, Chapel Hill) presents an updated visual atlas of orbital and eyelid anatomy, for residents and practicing physicians in ophthalmology, otolaryngology, plastic surgery, neurosurgery, dermatology, neuroradiology, and all others practitioners who diagnose and treat diseases of the eyelids and orbit.
In cats another condition, Haw's syndrome, has been observed - the only sign is protrusion of both third eyelids.
It may be that the eyelids were just bruised when she was hit by the ball.
Gently separate their eyelids with your thumbs or finger and thumb.