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Related to Expressions: Idioms

hangdog expression

A self-pitying expression of abjection, defeat, shame, or guilt. Don't just stare at me with that hangdog expression. You've already made a mess of things, so now you have to deal with it! The losing team walked away from the pitch with hangdog expressions after their execrable defeat at the hands of their rivals.
See also: expression, hangdog

I guess

 and I expect; I suppose; I suspect 
1. a phrase that introduces a supposition. (Frequently, in speech, suppose is reduced to 'spose, and expect and suspect are reduced to 'spect. The apostrophe is not always shown.) Bob: I guess it's going to rain. Bill: Oh, I don't know. Maybe so, maybe not. Alice: I expect you'll be wanting to leave pretty soon. John: Why? It's early yet.
2. a vague way of answering 'yes'. John: You want some more coffee? Jane: I 'spose. Alice: Ready to go? John: I spect.
See also: guess

I guess (so).

 and I believe so.; I expect (so).; I suppose (so).; I suspect (so).; I think so.
a vague expression of assent. (Frequently, in speech, suppose is reduced to 'spose, and expect and suspect are reduced to 'spect. The apostrophe is not always shown.) Tom: Will it rain today? Bob: I suppose so. Sue: Happy? Bill: I 'spect. Sue: You don't sound happy. Bill: I guess not.
See also: guess

if you'll pardon the expression

Fig. excuse the expression I am about to say or just said. This thing is—if you'll pardon the expression—loused up. I'm really jacked, if you'll pardon the expression.
See also: expression, if, pardon

not let someone catch someone doing something

 and not want to catch someone doing something
an expression that scolds someone who has done something wrong. (The idea is that the person ought not to do the wrong thing again, not that the person simply avoid getting caught.) How many times have I told you not to play ball in the house? Don't let me catch you doing that again. If I've told you once, I've told you a thousand times: Don't do that! I don't want to catch you doing it again!
See also: catch, not

There, there.

 and There, now.
an expression used to comfort someone. There, there. You'll feel better after you take a nap. There, now. Everything will be all right.

There, there.

something that you say to comfort someone, especially a child There, there. You'll feel better in a minute.

if you’ll pardon the expression

phr. excuse the expression I am about to say. This thing is—if you’ll pardon the expression—loused up. I’m really jacked, if you’ll pardon the expression.
See also: expression, if, pardon
References in classic literature ?
Perfectly still and silent, and not even fallen back in her chair, she sat under his hand, utterly insensible; with her eyes open and fixed upon him, and with that last expression looking as if it were carved or branded into her forehead.
She soon learnt that they were indebted for their present good understanding to the efforts of his aunt, who did call on him in her return through London, and there relate her journey to Longbourn, its motive, and the substance of her conversation with Elizabeth; dwelling emphatically on every expression of the latter which, in her ladyship's apprehension, peculiarly denoted her perverseness and assurance; in the belief that such a relation must assist her endeavours to obtain that promise from her nephew which she had refused to give.
However insignificant and petty Amelie's action may now seem to be, it was at that time a very natural expression of the prevailing hatred.
The irrepressible landlady gave the freest expression to her feelings.
What is the author's attitude toward Nature--(1) does he view Nature in a purely objective way, as a mass of material things, a series of material phenomena or a mere embodiment of sensuous beauty; or (2) is there symbolism or mysticism in his attitude, that is--does he view Nature with awe as a spiritual power; or (3) is he thoroughly subjective, reading his own moods into Nature or using Nature chiefly for the expression of his moods?
I see nothing wrong with my expression of interest in this red woman," retorted Sola.
Her voice, of immense power and sublime expression, gave to the rude, unpolished poetry of these psalms a magic and an effect which the most exalted Puritans rarely found in the songs of their brethren, and which they were forced to ornament with all the resources of their imagination.
The old man's eyes beamed with an expression of gentle affection.
He forgot his solo, and the expected compliments; and, for the rest of the evening, that thrilling expression floated in his brain, and was present to his thoughts; it was worth a thousand of the studied glances that were continually aimed at him from all sides of the room, and with every variety of eye--from the piercing black, to the ogling gray.
A woman's eye can read the face of the man she loves, its every feeling of pride, its every expression of suffering; it might almost be said that Heaven has graciously granted to women, on account of their very weakness, more than it has accorded to other creatures.
a masqueline shaving-glass - that I caught my second glimpse of my landlady's evil expression - levelled this time at myself.
I am willing to believe that the eye of the practiced artist can rest upon the Last Supper and renew a lustre where only a hint of it is left, supply a tint that has faded away, restore an expression that is gone; patch, and color, and add, to the dull canvas until at last its figures shall stand before him aglow with the life, the feeling, the freshness, yea, with all the noble beauty that was theirs when first they came from the hand of the master.
And still smiling, she pushed Tarzan gently away; and looking at him with a half-smiling, half-quizzical expression that made her face wholly entrancing, she pointed to the fruit upon the ground, and seated herself upon the edge of the earthen drum of the anthropoids, for hunger was asserting itself.
From time to time she smoothed the folds of her dress, and whenever the story produced an effect she glanced at Anna Pavlovna, at once adopted just the expression she saw on the maid of honor's face, and again relapsed into her radiant smile.
He has a power likewise of realizing and conveying to the consciousness of his reader abstract and elementary impressions, silence, darkness, absolute motionlessness, or, again, the whole complex sentiment of a particular place, the abstract expression of desolation in the long [99] white road, of peacefulness in a particular folding of the hills.