event

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in the course of

In or during the process of. In the course of your employment in the company, were you ever aware or suspicious of any illicit financial activity going on? I learned in the course of the meeting that our department was being downsized by over 50 percent.
See also: course, of

during the course of

In or during the process of. During the course of your employment in the company, were you ever aware or suspicious of any illicit financial activity going on? I learned during the course of the meeting that our department was being downsized by over 50 percent.
See also: course, during, of

over the course of

In or during the process of. Over the course of your employment in the company, were you ever aware or suspicious of any illicit financial activity going on? I learned over the course of the meeting that our department was being downsized by over 50 percent.
See also: course, of

in the event that

If it should happen or be the case that. In the event that we get stuck in traffic, there's no way I'll make my flight. I'd like to see you again, so give me a call in the event that you ever come back through Detroit.
See also: event

in the unlikely event (that) (something) happens

If a very improbable outcome turns out to be the case. I wouldn't worry too much, but in the unlikely event that you lose your job, you can always come live with us for a while. In the unlikely event I win the lottery, the first thing I would do is travel to Jamaica.
See also: event, happen, unlikely

meet and greet

1. adjective (hyphenated and used before a noun) Typified by a notable figure socializing with members of the public, the press, or guests in attendance. The meet-and-greet gala is being held to promote the presidential nominee's public profile and help drum up support ahead of the November election.
2. noun An event or reception in which a notable figure socializes with members of the public, the press, or guests in attendance. The normally media-shy singer is holding a meet and greet to help raise awareness for her newest charity campaign.
See also: and, greet, meet

turn of events

A sudden change or alteration in a situation or circumstance. After an unexpected turn of events, the president has announced that he will be resigning from office. Sometimes it takes a dramatic turn of events for our lives to head in the direction they were meant for.
See also: event, of, turn

able to make an event

able to attend an event. (Able to can be replaced with can.) I don't think I'll be able to make your party, but thanks for asking me.
See also: able, event, make

blessed event

Fig. the birth of a child. My sister is expecting a blessed event sometime in May. The young couple anxiously awaited the blessed event.
See also: blessed, event

Coming events cast their shadows before.

Prov. Significant events are often preceded by signs that they are about to happen. (From Thomas Campbell's poem, "Lochiel's Warning.") If you pay attention to the news, you can generally tell when something momentous is about to happen. Coming events cast their shadows before.
See also: before, cast, coming, event, shadow

in any case

 and in any event
no matter what happens. I intend to be home by supper time, but in any case by eight o'clock. In any event, I'll see you this evening.
See also: any, case

in case (something happens)

in the event that something takes place. She carries an umbrella in case it rains. I have some aspirin in my office in case I get a headache. He keeps afire extinguisher in his car, just in case.
See also: case

in the event of something

if something happens; on the chance that something happens. In the event of his late arrival, please call me. In the event of rain, the parade is canceled.
See also: event, of

in the unlikely event of something

 and in the unlikely event that something happens
if something—which probably will not happen—actually happens. In the unlikely event of my getting the job, I'll have to buy a car to get there every day. In the unlikely event of a fire, please walk quickly to an exit.
See also: event, of, unlikely

It is easy to be wise after the event.

Prov. After you see the consequences of a decision, it is easy to tell if the decision was good, but it is also too late, since the consequences have already happened. Jill: I should never have invited Aunt Betsy to stay with me; I haven't had a peaceful moment since she got here. Jane: Well, it's easy to be wise after the event.
See also: after, easy, event, wise

in any case

whatever happens in any event You should be able to catch a bus, but in any case you can always take a taxi home. In any case, you should test drive the car before buying it.
Usage notes: the same meaning can be also expressed by come what may, come hell or high water, at (the very) least, and either way
Related vocabulary: one way or the other
See also: any, case

in case

if I don't expect much traffic, but in case there is some, I think we should leave early.
See also: case

in any event

also at all events
whatever happens in any case I hope to meet her this afternoon, but in any event I have to return home tomorrow.
Usage notes: the same meaning can also be expressed by at (the very) least, come hell or high water, come what may, and either way
Related vocabulary: one way or the other
See also: any, event

in the event of something

also in the event that something happens
if something should happen In the event of war, we have to be prepared to send in troops. Travel insurance protects you in the event that you have to cancel your trip.
Usage notes: sometimes used in the form in the unlikely event (if something should happen that you do not expect to happen): In the unlikely event of a fire, alarms will sound and you should exit immediately.
Related vocabulary: in case of something
See also: event, of

It's easy to be wise after the event.

  (British, American & Australian) also It's easy to be smart after the fact. (American)
something that you say which means that it is easy to understand what you could have done to prevent something bad from happening after it has happened In retrospect I suppose we should have realised that she was in trouble and tried to help her, but then I suppose it's easy to be wise after the event. People often tell me they'd never have taken out a loan if they'd thought about it more carefully - but it's easy to be smart after the fact.
See also: after, easy, event, wise

the happy event

  (humorous)
the birth of a child So when are they expecting the happy event?
See also: event, happy

blessed event

The birth of a baby, as in When is the blessed event expected? This expression combines two senses of blessed, that is, "happy" and "sacred." Today, however, unless used ironically, it is considered cloyingly sentimental. [1920s]
See also: blessed, event

in any case

Also, at all events; in any event. No matter what happens, certainly; also, whatever the fact is, anyway. For example, In any case, I plan to go, or Call me tomorrow, at all events, or He may not be getting a raise, but in any event his boss thinks highly of him. In any case dates from the second half of the 1800s, at all events from about 1700, and in any event from the 1900s. For an antonym, see in no case.
See also: any, case

in case

1. Also, just in case. If it should happen that. For example, In case he doesn't show up, we have a backup speaker. The variant also is used without a following clause to mean simply "as a precaution," as in I took an umbrella just in case. [c. 1400]
2. in case of; in the event of. If there should happen to be. For example, Here is a number to call in case of an emergency, or In the event of a power failure, we'll have to shift our plans. Similarly, in that case means "if that should happen," as in You're alone in the store? In that case I'll bring your lunch. The first usage dates from the early 1700s, the second (with event) from about 1600, and the third from the mid-1800s. Also see in any case; in no case; in the case of.
See also: case

in the course of

Also, during the course of. In the process or progress of, as in the famous phrase from the Declaration of Independence (1776), "When in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands ..." These phrases have been criticized as needlessly wordy ( in or during alone are adequate), but they have an emphatic rhythm that keeps them alive. [Mid-1600s]
See also: course, of

in the event of

Also, in the event that. See under in case, def. 2.
See also: event, of

in the unlikely event

If something improbable should occur. For example, In the unlikely event that I'm held up, please cover for me, or In the unlikely event that we should have snow in May, we're still well equipped to cope with it . Also see under in case, def. 2.
See also: event, unlikely

in any case

Regardless of what has occurred or will occur.
See also: any, case

in case

1. If it happens that; if.
2. As a precaution: took along an umbrella, just in case.
See also: case

at all events

In any case.
See also: all, event

in any event

In any case: In any event, the audience seemed pleased with your performance.
See also: any, event

in the event

If it should happen; in case: In the event of an emergency, call 911.
See also: event
References in classic literature ?
That is to say, they believe that every psychical event has a psychical cause and a physical concomitant.
Having ascertained the fact before alluded to, that the islanders,--from motives of precaution, dwelt altogether in the depths of the valleys, and avoided wandering about the more elevated portions of the shore, unless bound on some expedition of war or plunder, I concluded that if I could effect unperceived a passage to the mountain, I might easily remain among them, supporting myself by such fruits as came in my way until the sailing of the ship, an event of which I could not fail to be immediately apprised, as from my lofty position I should command a view of the entire harbour.
In such an event what a solace would a companion be?
The event which it authorized soon followed: Henry and Catherine were married, the bells rang, and everybody smiled; and, as this took place within a twelvemonth from the first day of their meeting, it will not appear, after all the dreadful delays occasioned by the general's cruelty, that they were essentially hurt by it.
This is an evil among all things that are done under the sun, that there is one event unto all; yea, also the heart of the sons of men is full of evil, and madness is in their heart while they live, and after that they go to the dead.
All is vanity and vexation of spirit,' 'There is no profit under the sun,' 'There is one event unto all,' to the fool and the wise, the clean and the unclean, the sinner and the saint, and that event is death, and an evil thing, he says.
Through chapter after chapter he is worried by the one event that cometh to all alike.
Other members may be indifferent because, ultimately, providing security for major events is an impermanent task, and the security mission will end with the conclusion of the event.
If we can have events happening in all four seasons, this is better for everyone," Storie says.
an Atlanta-based public relations, marketing, special events and conventions services firm: "Once you've looked at your budget and you have a feel for the scope of the event, you can review your budget and determine essential areas that cannot be compromised.
Three-Day Event to Feature Innovative Conference, Networking Events;
ShowPro is set up in a multi-layered system, with products and services tailored to suit the needs of both large and small-scale events.
Caputo is not describing space-time, as Whitehead is, in terms of a cosmology of events rhythmically emergent out of the matrix of their relations.
Events and conferences are big business in Northern Ontario and not just for hotels and convention centres.
In fact, the tragic events of September 11, 2001, redefined the role and responsibilities of the U.