Eskimo

(redirected from Eskimos)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

(someone) could sell an icebox to an Eskimo

Someone is an extremely smooth, charming, or persuasive salesperson, such that they could sell something to those who have no need or use for it. (The phrase should be used with caution, as the term "Eskimo" is considered by some to be offensive or derogatory. It alludes to the various indigenous peoples of the traditionally cold, snowy northern circumpolar regions of the globe, who thus would have no reason to buy an icebox.) I can't believe you were able to sell an extra 200 units to the hospital. You could sell an icebox to an Eskimo!
See also: could, Eskimo, sell

(someone) could sell ice to Eskimos

Someone is an extremely smooth, charming, or persuasive salesperson, such that they could sell something to people who have no need or use for it. (The phrase alludes to the various indigenous peoples of the traditionally cold, snowy northern circumpolar regions of the globe, who thus would have no shortage of (and no need to buy) ice. It should be used with caution, though, as the term "Eskimo" is considered by some to be offensive or derogatory. ) I can't believe you were able to sell an extra 200 units to the hospital. You could sell ice to Eskimos!
See also: could, Eskimo, ice, sell
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the new review of information has determined that Bang and Dyerberg failed to actually investigate the cardiovascular health of the Eskimo population, meaning that the cardioprotective effects of their diet are unsubstantiated.
Ironically, LaRose played against the Eskimos in the Lions' season opener on July 4 in Edmonton.
Eskimo peoples inhabit a broad swath of Earth's Arctic region.
One of these, The Eskimo Book of Knowledge by George Binney, is a classic published by the Hudson's Bay Company in 1931.
And if the overarching goal is to provide a better life for the Eskimos, it would be far simpler and many times cheaper for the government to simply send along a check.
But 16 years later, what Alaskans refer to as "subsistence" activities--the traditional gathering of fish, game and plants for personal and cultural use--remain diminished in the mostly Alutiiq Eskimo villages affected by the oil disaster.
ESKIMO ARCHITECTURE: DWELLING AND STRUCTURE IN THE EARLY HISTORIC PERIOD
Unused to the damp and muggy climate of New York, the Eskimos fell ill and were soon in hospital suffering from chronic pneumonia, an illness which took the lives of four of the group including Minik's father.
However, mum and dad did things their way, helping each other out, and the Eskimos thought this was hilarious, seeing the man doing the woman's work.
Exxon was ordered to pay $5 billion in punitive damages to commercial fishermen, Eskimos, property owners and others harmed by the spill.
They used to be called Eskimos by outsiders, but they prefer the name Yup'ik.
Kane, in High Arctic Greenland in 1853-55, came up with a uniquely contradictory description of one particular Eskimo woman: "Six Esquimaux, three of them women,--that ugly beauty, Nessark's wife, at the head of them,--had come off to the boats for shelter from the gale.
Eskimos will be staging a second subsistence walrus hunt on the Round Island sanctuary in October, and it appears at least one change will be made based on last year's inaugural experience.
Two examples are "kayak-angst" among Greenland's Eskimos and "koro" in Southeast Asia, she asserts.