English

(redirected from Englishness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

body English

An often involuntary or unconscious movement of the body to try and manipulate or influence the course of an object that is already in motion. I always find bowlers' body English humorous, as they contort their bodies to try to will the ball toward the pins.
See also: body, English

full English

Short for "full English breakfast," a traditional breakfast meal in England typically consisting of fried eggs, tomato, mushrooms, bacon, sausage, and fried bread or hash browns. Primarily heard in UK. After a long night out at the pubs, there's nothing like a full English the next morning to get you back into shape.
See also: English, full

in plain English

In clear, straightforward, and uncomplicated English. Chronic atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries has stopped oxygen-rich blood from reaching the heart, leading to a myocardial infarction. In plain English, you've suffered a heart attack. I wish these software agreements would be written in plain English, rather than this legalese gobbledygook.
See also: English, plain

in simple English

In clear, straightforward, and uncomplicated English terminology. Chronic atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries has stopped oxygen-rich blood from reaching the heart, leading to a myocardial infarction. In simple English, you've suffered a heart attack. I wish these software agreements would be written in simple English, rather than this legalese gobbledygook.
See also: English, simple

BBC English

Formal, proper English, as would be spoken on the BBC (the British Broadcasting Corporation). Just so you know, the professor talks in that BBC English, so you might have a hard time understanding him. And he might not get your slang either.
See also: English

simple English

Clear, straightforward, and uncomplicated English terminology. Chronic atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries has stopped oxygen-rich blood from reaching the heart, leading to a myocardial infarction. In simple English, you've suffered a heart attack. I wish these software agreements would be written in simple English, rather than this legalese gobbledygook.
See also: English, simple

the King's English

The standard form of English, as spoken by educated people in England. We're friends now, so quit being so formal and speaking the King's English. As a professor, you really should speak the King's English.
See also: English

*in plain language

 and *in plain English
Fig. in simple, clear, and straightforward language. (*Typically: be ~; put something [into] ~; say something ~; write something ~.) That's too confusing. Please say it again in plain English. Tell me again in plain language.
See also: language, plain

(The) Queen's English

"Official" British English. He can't even speak The Queen's English! Despicable!
See also: English

body English

Movements of the body that express a person's feelings, as in His body English tells us just how tired he is. This expression originated about 1900 in such sports as bowling and ice hockey, where a player tries to influence the path of a ball or puck by moving his body in a particular direction. (It was based on the earlier use of English to mean "spin imparted to a ball.")
See also: body, English

in plain English

In clear, straightforward language, as in The doctor's diagnosis was too technical; please tell us what he meant in plain English. [c. 1500] Also see in so many words.
See also: English, plain
References in periodicals archive ?
That sense of threat is a defining impulse within current forms of Englishness and is evoked in a very wide range of writings on the internet, in the media, and in a lot of cultural works.
Through their research into the commemoration of Englishness in the past among English immigrants in North America, the speakers aim to make a significant contribution to contemporary definitions of English identity and culture.
Class is very much part of the story of Englishness in two senses.
It's pleasing people are taking an interest in the project and hope it will encourage them to think about what Englishness needs today.
Englishness appears to be a repetitive, ambiguous process for her, an "unfinished business" (129).
Aliens and Englishness in Elizabethan Drama, by Lloyd Edward Kermode.
It is in the century's novels, more so than in contemporary scholarship, that the author finds class adequately theorized as an unstable category through which post-imperial England is re-imagined; over the course of the century, a "fiercely contested" narrative of Englishness centered on class difference displaces, but does not forget, the shattered identity of imperial Britain (7-8).
Empire and After: Englishness in Postcolonial Perspective is a valuable addition to what, since the early 1990s, has been "a sustained renewal of interest in British national identity" across diverse disciplines and inter-disciplines, including history, literature, politics, and cultural studies (1).
Her affected old-timey Englishness can be grating, and when you see her opposite Emily Watson (playing Norman's sister), you daydream about what Watson would have done with the part.
I am a believer in independence for this country and try to point out that a sense of "Britishness" in London really means a sense of Englishness and I feel that is unfair.
Englishness' yet nowhere in the text is a distinction made between Englishness and Britishness, indeed the index treats them as interchangeable ('see also Englishness' appears under 'Britishness' and vice versa).
The enterprise points to the eventual Englishness of Pevsner--an osmotic process which saw him steering the wartime Architectural Review in some surprising directions, interestingly discussed by Michela Rosso.
The Island Race: Englishness, Empire and Gender in the Eighteenth Century.
This latest release finds them daring to remain steadfastly themselves, never once apologizing for their idiosyncratic Englishness or their refusal to leave behind the year 1966, with lyrics about middle-aged moms parking strollers in front of Sainsbury's grocery store and dreaming of the past as their old 45s get dusty.
In the double inside-outside perspective that postcolonial readings of culture went to such lengths to legitimise, Ackroyd's celebration of Englishness represents, I will argue here, a necessary form of liberation from an idiosyncratic identity mindset made complicated by culture, politics and by a hyperconscious sense of the perils of nationalism and the illusory nature of national identity.