English


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to English: English vocabulary, English speaking, English Premier league

body English

An often involuntary or unconscious movement of the body to try and manipulate or influence the course of an object that is already in motion. I always find bowlers' body English humorous, as they contort their bodies to try to will the ball toward the pins.
See also: body, English

full English

Short for "full English breakfast," a traditional breakfast meal in England typically consisting of fried eggs, tomato, mushrooms, bacon, sausage, and fried bread or hash browns. Primarily heard in UK. After a long night out at the pubs, there's nothing like a full English the next morning to get you back into shape.
See also: English, full

in plain English

In clear, straightforward, and uncomplicated English. Chronic atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries has stopped oxygen-rich blood from reaching the heart, leading to a myocardial infarction. In plain English, you've suffered a heart attack. I wish these software agreements would be written in plain English, rather than this legalese gobbledygook.
See also: English, plain

in simple English

In clear, straightforward, and uncomplicated English terminology. Chronic atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries has stopped oxygen-rich blood from reaching the heart, leading to a myocardial infarction. In simple English, you've suffered a heart attack. I wish these software agreements would be written in simple English, rather than this legalese gobbledygook.
See also: English, simple

BBC English

Formal, proper English, as would be spoken on the BBC (the British Broadcasting Corporation). Just so you know, the professor talks in that BBC English, so you might have a hard time understanding him. And he might not get your slang either.
See also: English

simple English

Clear, straightforward, and uncomplicated English terminology. Chronic atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries has stopped oxygen-rich blood from reaching the heart, leading to a myocardial infarction. In simple English, you've suffered a heart attack. I wish these software agreements would be written in simple English, rather than this legalese gobbledygook.
See also: English, simple

the King's English

The standard form of English, as spoken by educated people in England. We're friends now, so quit being so formal and speaking the King's English. As a professor, you really should speak the King's English.
See also: English

*in plain language

 and *in plain English
Fig. in simple, clear, and straightforward language. (*Typically: be ~; put something [into] ~; say something ~; write something ~.) That's too confusing. Please say it again in plain English. Tell me again in plain language.
See also: language, plain

(The) Queen's English

"Official" British English. He can't even speak The Queen's English! Despicable!
See also: English

body English

Movements of the body that express a person's feelings, as in His body English tells us just how tired he is. This expression originated about 1900 in such sports as bowling and ice hockey, where a player tries to influence the path of a ball or puck by moving his body in a particular direction. (It was based on the earlier use of English to mean "spin imparted to a ball.")
See also: body, English

in plain English

In clear, straightforward language, as in The doctor's diagnosis was too technical; please tell us what he meant in plain English. [c. 1500] Also see in so many words.
See also: English, plain

the ˌKing’s/ˌQueen’s ˈEnglish

(old-fashioned or humorous) (in Britain) correct standard English: I can’t understand a word you’re saying. Can’t you speak the Queen’s English?
See also: English

in plain ˈEnglish

simply and clearly expressed, without using technical language: I don’t understand these documents at all. Why can’t they write them in plain English?
See also: English, plain
References in classic literature ?
He persuaded as many of them as he could to leave off their idle and wandering habits, and to build houses and cultivate the earth, as the English did.
Well," said Vogelstein, "if she's of the lower class it seems to me very--very--" And he paused a moment, as he often paused in speaking English, looking for his word.
Here he was met by his English valet with a face of consternation which led him to ask if a cab weren't forthcoming.
May I ask how it is that one who writes English does not speak it?
He was a most eager student, and in two more days had mastered so much French that he could speak little sentences such as: "That is a tree," "this is grass," "I am hungry," and the like, but D'Arnot found that it was difficult to teach him the French construction upon a foundation of English.
The villa was a roomy white house, which, as is the case with most continental houses, looked to an English eye frail, ramshackle, and absurdly frivolous, more like a pagoda in a tea-garden than a place where one slept.
Saintsbury is certainly right in thinking that, as regards style, English literature has much to do.
And it is the dream of my heart that our English pennons shall wave upon the Mount of Olives, and the lions and lilies float over the holy city.
For the English knew little of the Highlanders and their customs.
Chronological Outlines of English Literature' (Macmillan, $1.
Beyond this again was gently rising country, on which was the first English outpost, supported by others which lay, however, considerably in its rear.
The Belgians in vain interposed to prevent the butchery of the English.
And the smallest, Lily, was bewitching in her naive astonishment at everything, and it was difficult not to smile when, after taking the sacrament, she said in English, "Please, some more.
Behind them stood a little delicate-looking light-haired English boy carrying a bag.
We picked up some more English sailors here after this, and some Dutch, and now we resolved on a second voyage to the south-east for cloves, &c.