England


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shut (one's) eyes and think of England

1. Typically of a woman (specifically a wife), to endure unwanted or unpleasant sexual intercourse—as out of a sense of duty or obligation—by distracting oneself with more pleasant thoughts. Refers to alleged advice for wives in the 19th and early 20th centuries that placed unwanted sexual activity as the price of the security of marriage. Primarily heard in UK. It's horrible to think that women who were not attracted to their husbands, but who depended on the security of their marriage, were once told to simply shut their eyes and think of England to satisfy their husband's desires.
2. By extension, to endure any unpleasant or unwanted task or experience by thinking of one's duty, the benefits of the experience, or by distracting oneself with more pleasant thoughts. Primarily heard in UK. Whenever I have to have a tooth filled at the dentist, I just shut my eyes and think of England.
See also: and, England, eye, of, shut, think

lie back and think of England

1. Typically of a woman (specifically a wife), to endure unwanted or unpleasant sexual intercourse—as out of a sense of duty or obligation—by distracting oneself with more pleasant thoughts. Refers to alleged advice for wives in the 19th and early 20th centuries that placed unwanted sexual activity as the price of the security of marriage. Primarily heard in UK. It's horrible to think that women who were not attracted to their husbands, but who depended on the security of their marriage, were once told to simply lie back and think of England to satisfy their husband's desires.
2. By extension, to endure any unpleasant or unwanted task or experience by of thinking one's duty, the benefits of the experience, or by distracting oneself with more pleasant thoughts. Primarily heard in UK. Whenever I have to have a tooth filled at the dentist, I just lie back and think of England.
See also: and, back, England, lie, of, think

for England

A lot. Often used in the phrase "talk for England," meaning to talk a lot. Whenever I'm with Miranda, she just talks for England, and I can't get a word in!
See also: England

Close your eyes and think of England.

  (mainly British humorous)
if you close your eyes and think of England when you have sex with someone, you do not enjoy it, but do it because you think you should Just close your eyes and think of England. He'll never notice.
See be close to the bone, close the door on, close eyes to, close at hand, close to heart, be close to the mark, shut up shop, sail close to the wind
See also: and, close, England, eye, of, think
References in classic literature ?
Those who occupied the gallery to whom this injurious and unpolite speech was addressed, were the family of Cedric the Saxon, with that of his ally and kinsman, Athelstane of Coningsburgh, a personage, who, on account of his descent from the last Saxon monarchs of England, was held in the highest respect by all the Saxon natives of the north of England.
Those around him were his favorite councillors, and the bitterest foes of New England.
A fleet of ten or twelve vessels, with many hundred passengers, left England about the same time; for a multitude of people, who were discontented with the king's government and oppressed by the bishops, were flocking over to the New World.
The genius of England was no longer with us, but with him.
He might just as well have been born in a Roman Catholic country as in England; and in England as well in a Wesleyan, Baptist, or Methodist family as in one that fortunately belonged to the church by law established.
It was a great privilege to meet throughout England those who had known and honoured the late William Lloyd Garrison, the Hon.
It all happened in the thirteenth century, and while it was happening it shook England from north to south and from east to west; and reached across the channel and shook France.
The narrative was written by myself--a citizen of the United States, visiting England with his wife.
So, even as he conquered England by the sword, he conquered our literature too.
There's a part of the United States of North America that used to be known to the ancients as New England," he replied.
The Britons, from whom the present Welsh are descended, inhabited what is now England and Wales; and they were still further subdivided, like most barbarous peoples, into many tribes which were often at war with one another.
It is as if a fragment of England floated forward to greet the foreigner--chalk of our chalk, turf of our turf, epitome of what will follow.
This letter will reach England by a merchantman now on its homeward voyage from Archangel; more fortunate than I, who may not see my native land, perhaps, for many years.
In this vessel, after a long voyage, I arrived in England the 11th of June, in the year 1687, having been thirty-five years absent.
I told him I was on the Maryland side of the bay, at the plantation of a particular friend who came from England in the same ship with me; that as for that side of the bay where he was, I had no habitation.