driver

(redirected from Drivers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

backseat driver

1. A passenger in a vehicle (not necessarily in the backseat) who attempts to instruct the driver or criticize his or her driving skills. John quickly became annoyed at Mary's tendency to become a backseat driver whenever he drove her somewhere, so he just began to let her drive.
2. By extension, someone who tries to establish and maintain control over every situation. Primarily heard in US. Although Mary was capable of completing the project on her own, John couldn't stop himself from being a backseat driver and telling her what to do.
See also: backseat, driver

designated driver

A person who stays sober during a social gathering and is responsible for safely driving others from one location to another. Since Kara never drinks alcohol, she always offers to be the designated driver for her friends.
See also: designate, driver

backseat driver

Fig. an annoying passenger who tells the driver how to drive; someone who tells others how to do things. I don't need any backseat driver on this project. Stop pestering me with all your advice. Nobody likes a backseat driver!
See also: backseat, driver

in the driver's seat

Fig. in control; in charge of things. (As if one were driving and controlling the vehicle.) Now that Fred is in the driver's seat, there is a lot less criticism about how things are being done. Joan can't wait to get into the driver's seat and do what she can to turn things around.
See also: seat

Sunday driver

a slow and leisurely driver who appears to be sightseeing and enjoying the view, holding up traffic in the process. (Also a term of address.) I'm a Sunday driver, and I'm sorry. I just can't bear to go faster. Move over, you Sunday driver!
See also: driver, Sunday

in the driver's seat

in control of a situation Huge consumer demand for electricity has put energy companies in the driver's seat.
Related vocabulary: in the saddle
See also: seat

a backseat driver

 
1. a passenger in a car who continuously tells the driver how they should drive Mike's a real backseat driver and I find it so irritating.
2. (mainly American) someone who expects to control things although it is not their responsibility to do this Tell her you're in charge now. It's time she stopped being a backseat driver.
See also: backseat, driver

a designated driver

  (American)
one person in a group who agrees not to drink alcohol in order to drive the other people to and from a place where they will drink alcohol Tom said he'd be the designated driver when we go out tonight.
See also: designate, driver

be in the driving seat

  (British) also be in the driver's seat (American & Australian)
to be in control of a situation The consumer is in the driving seat due to the huge range of goods on the market.
See fly by the seat of pants
See also: driving, seat

backseat driver

A passenger who gives unwanted and/or unneeded directions to the driver; also, a person who interferes in affairs without having knowledge, responsibility, or authority for doing so. For example, Aunt Mary drives us all crazy with her instructions; she's an incurable backseat driver. This term originated in the United States in the 1920s, when it was first used for a passenger legitimately directing a chauffeur, and it was quickly transferred to figurative use. Also see the synonym Monday-morning quarterback and the antonym take a back seat.
See also: backseat, driver

in the driver's seat

Also, in the saddle. In control, in a position of authority. For example, With the boss on vacation, Mr. Burns was in the driver's seat and enjoying it, or She waited until after the election, knowing that she'd be in the saddle then. The first expression dates from the 1800s, the second from the early 1600s. Also see at the helm.
See also: seat

backseat driver

n. an annoying passenger who tells the driver how to drive; someone who tells others how to do things. I don’t need any backseat driver on this project.
See also: backseat, driver

in the driver’s seat

mod. in control. I’m in the driver’s seat now, and I get to decide who gets raises.
See also: seat

Sunday driver

n. a slow and leisurely driver who appears to be sightseeing and enjoying the view, holding up traffic in the process. (Also a term of address.) Move over, you Sunday driver!
See also: driver, Sunday
References in classic literature ?
And at last, when the flames died down, and the red light of the logs made the elephants look as though they had been dipped in blood too, Machua Appa, the head of all the drivers of all the Keddahs--Machua Appa, Petersen Sahib's other self, who had never seen a made road in forty years: Machua Appa, who was so great that he had no other name than Machua Appa,--leaped to his feet, with Little Toomai held high in the air above his head, and shouted: "Listen, my brothers.
When we discovered that, that legend of our driver took to itself a new interest in our eyes.
At the same moment, laying on his whip, and standing up to his task, the coal driver rushed horses and waggon squarely in front of the advancing procession, pulled the horses up sharply, and put on the big brake.
He developed too great a tendency to climb down from his truck and fight with other drivers.
The driver went about his work, and he called to Buck when he was ready to put him in his old place in front of Dave.
Forth trundled the cab into the Christmas streets, the fare within plunged in the blackness of a despair that neighboured on unconsciousness, the driver on the box digesting his rebuke and his customer's duplicity.
I could not understand then what the haste meant, but the driver was evidently bent on losing no time in reaching Borgo Prund.
said Julia, as she stood looking at the driver tottering under the weight of the trunks.
On the contrary, finding that the cries and blows of their driver were redoubled at this juncture, the leaders backed upon the pole-horses, who in their turn backed the sleigh.
As the driver closed the door upon us, I heard him whisper to the three countrymen,"How do you suppose a fellow feels shut up in the cage with a she tiger?
Again he made no reply, but the driver of our carriage came to my rescue.
He put his head out of the window again, and gave another order to the driver.
The donkeys galloped, the wagon rolled on smoothly, the boys slept (Lamp-Wick snored like a dormouse) and the little, fat driver sang sleepily between his teeth.
It was six o'clock already, and so, in order to be there quickly, and at the same time not to drive with his own horses, known to everyone, Vronsky got into Yashvin's hired fly, and told the driver to drive as quickly as possible.
Crisparkle could hardly see anything else of it for a large outside passenger seated on the box, with his elbows squared, and his hands on his knees, compressing the driver into a most uncomfortably small compass, and glowering about him with a strongly-marked face.