disease

(redirected from Diseases)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to Diseases: Communicable diseases

Christmas disease

Hemophilia (or haemophilia) B, a blood-clotting disorder in which a mutation of the Factor IX gene leads to a deficiency of Factor IX (or Christmas factor), a serine protease of the coagulation system. Both the factor and the disease are named for Stephen Christmas (not the holiday), the first patient discovered to have the condition in 1952. We haven't let our daughter participate in any more physical sports since she was diagnosed with Christmas disease last year.
See also: Christmas, disease

Desperate diseases must have desperate remedies.

Prov. If you have a seemingly insurmountable problem, you must do things you ordinarily would not do in order to solve it. Fred: All my employees have been surly and morose for months. How can I improve their morale? Alan: Why not give everyone a raise? Fred: That's a pretty extreme suggestion. Alan: Yes, but desperate diseases must have desperate remedies.

(the) disease to please

an obsessive need to please people. I, like so many, am afflicted with the disease to please. I am just too nice for my own good.
See also: disease, please

*down with a disease

ill; sick at home. (Can be said about many diseases. *Typically: be ~; Come ~; get~.) Tom isn't here. He's down with a cold. Sally is down with the flu.
See also: disease, down

foot-in-mouth disease

the tendency to say the wrong thing at the wrong time. I suffer a lot from foot-in-mouth disease. Well, Ralph has foot-in-mouth disease again.
See also: disease

shake a disease or illness off

Fig. [for the body] to fight off a disease or illness. I thought I was catching a cold, but I guess I shook it off. I hope I can shake off this flu pretty soon.
See also: disease, off, shake

foot in one's mouth, put one's

Say something foolish, embarrassing, or tactless. For example, Jane put her foot in her mouth when she called him by her first husband's name. This notion is sometimes put as having foot-in-mouth disease, as in He has a bad case of foot-in-mouth disease, always making some tactless remark. The first expression dates from about 1900. The variant, dating from the mid-1900s, is a play on the foot-and-mouth (sometimes called hoof-and-mouth) disease that afflicts cattle, causing eruptions to break out around the mouth and hoofs.
See also: foot, put

foot-in-mouth disease

n. the tendency to say the wrong thing at the wrong time. Well, Ralph has foot-in-mouth disease again.
See also: disease

white man’s disease

n. the inability to jump in basketball. You break your leg, Walter? Or you got a case of white man’s disease.
See also: disease, white
References in classic literature ?
Bright's disease, I was relieved to find, I had only in a modified form, and, so far as that was concerned, I might live for years.
I believe that you are suffering from what is called fatty degeneration of the heart, a disease which was first divined and explored by Laennec, the man who gave us the stethoscope, not so very many years ago.
Not so extraordinary, I replied, if you bear in mind that in former days, as is commonly said, before the time of Herodicus, the guild of Asclepius did not practise our present system of medicine, which may be said to educate diseases.
Such symptoms, when a disease of the kind is rife, are usually the signs of sickening.
For countless years I judged there had been no danger of war or solitary violence, no danger from wild beasts, no wasting disease to require strength of constitution, no need of toil.
Thus, heat, cold, disease, health, and so on are dispositions.
For my part, I have no heart; so I cannot have heart disease.
Nothing of emotion could be seen on his face, disfigured already by the loathsome disease.
This was the young poet who looked after the book half of the village drug and book store, and who wrote poetry in such leisure as he found from his duties, and with such strength as he found in the disease preying upon him.
Others quit the game early, having drawn cards that called for violent death, or famine in the Barrens, or loathsome and lingering disease.
I come to you, because my case is outside of all lines and rules, and because you are famous in your profession for the discovery of mysteries in disease.
A KIND-HEARTED Physician sitting at the bedside of a patient afflicted with an incurable and painful disease, heard a noise behind him, and turning saw a cat laughing at the feeble efforts of a wounded mouse to drag itself out of the room.
Unfortunately for Joseph the disease which had cut off his parents did not stop at that; it went on and extirpated nearly the whole Brownon contingent and its allies by marriage; and those who fled did not return.
Pardon me, Most Royal Ozma," replied one of her generals; "but I find that I and my brother officers all suffer from heart disease, and the slightest excitement might kill us.
He was in the last stages of heart disease, and just before I could show him what I thought of him he went off.