dime

(redirected from DIMES)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

dime's worth of difference

A miniscule, insignificant, or indiscernible amount of difference. Often used in the negative for extra emphasis. There isn't a dime's worth of difference between the two candidates—they're both crooks, in my opinion. You can holler all you like, it won't make a dime's worth of difference.
See also: difference, of, worth

drop a dime

To snitch or inform on someone to a person of higher authority. Originally street slang for informing to police, it refers to the old price of using a public payphone (10 cents). Primarily heard in US, South Africa. Timmy is such a teacher's pet, always ready to drop a dime on any of the other students he thinks are misbehaving. He knew he was facing 10 years in prison, so he agreed to drop a dime or two to police in exchange for a lighter sentence.
See also: dime, drop

yankee dime

A kiss. My grandmother would always say, "Come give me a yankee dime, my dear," when she wanted a kiss.
See also: dime, Yankee

dime a dozen

Ubiquitous; so abundant or common as to hold little or no value. In Los Angeles, waiters trying to become famous actors are a dime a dozen. That bird might be a rare sight where you come from, but around here they're a dime a dozen.
See also: dime, dozen

be a dime a dozen

To be ubiquitous; to be so abundant or common as to hold little or no value. In Los Angeles, waiters trying to become famous actors are a dime a dozen. That bird might be a rare sight where you come from, but around here they're a dime a dozen.
See also: dime, dozen

not worth a dime

slang Worthless; undeserving of even the smallest amount of money. These wild abstract paintings are not worth a dime to me—they give me a headache! That house is not worth a dime, if you ask me. I mean, the ceiling has already partially collapsed, and the foundation is sinking!
See also: dime, not, worth

nickel and dime (someone) to death

To assess costs or fees in enough small amounts that it adds up to a substantial sum. Between the increases in property tax, sales tax, and income tax, I feel like the government is trying nickel and dime us to death. That phone company is nickel and diming their customers to death with all those fees.
See also: and, death, dime, nickel

be not worth a dime

slang To be worthless; to be undeserving of even the smallest amount of money. These wild abstract paintings are not worth a dime to me—they give me a headache! That house is not worth a dime, if you ask me. I mean, the ceiling has already partially collapsed, and the foundation is sinking!
See also: dime, not, worth

nickel and dime (one)

To assess costs or fees in enough small amounts that it adds up to a substantial sum. Between the increases in property tax, sales tax, and income tax, I feel like the government is constantly trying to nickel and dime us. My phone company has been nickel and diming me for years.
See also: and, dime, nickel

stop cold

To immediately or suddenly stop or come to a complete halt. I don't know what happened. The engine was running fine a second ago but then just stopped cold! Both of us stopped cold when we hear the gunshot in the distance.
See also: cold, stop

nickel-and-dime

To assess costs or fees in enough small amounts that it adds up to a substantial sum. Between the increases in property tax, sales tax, and income tax, I feel like the government is trying nickel-and-dime us to death. That phone company is nickel-and-diming their customers with all those fees.

(a) dime a dozen

Fig. abundant; cheap and common. People who can write good books are not a dime a dozen. Romantic movies are a dime a dozen.
See also: dime, dozen

get off the dime

Sl. to start moving; to get out of a stopped position. Why don't you get off the dime and complete some of these projects that you started? As soon as the board of directors gets off the dime on this proposal, we will have some action.
See also: dime, get, off

nickel-and-dime someone (to death)

Fig. to make numerous small monetary charges that add up to a substantial sum. Those contractors nickel-and-dimed me to death. Just give me the whole bill at one time. Don't nickel-and-dime me for days on end.

not worth a dime

 and not worth a red cent
worthless. This land is all swampy. It's not worth a dime. This pen I bought isn't worth a dime. It has no ink.
See also: dime, not, worth

stop on a dime

Fig. to come to a stop in a very short distance. This thing will stop on a dime. Imagine a bus that could stop on a dime.
See also: dime, on, stop

stop someone cold

to halt someone immediately. When you told us the bad news, it stopped me cold.
See also: cold, stop

turn on a dime

Fig.[for a vehicle] to turn in a very tight turn. This car can turn on a dime. I need a vehicle that can turn on a dime.
See also: dime, on, turn

dime a dozen

So plentiful as to be valueless. For example, Don't bother to buy one of these-they're a dime a dozen. The dime was declared the American ten-cent coin in 1786 by the Continental Congress. [First half of 1900s]
See also: dime, dozen

drop a dime

Inform on or betray someone, as in No one can cheat in this class-someone's bound to drop a dime and tell the teacher. This expression, alluding to the ten-cent coin long used for making a telephone call, originated as underworld slang for phoning the police to inform on a criminal and occasionally is extended to any kind of betrayal. [1960s]
See also: dime, drop

get off the dime

Take action, especially following a time of indecision or delay. For example, It's time this administration got off the dime and came up with a viable budget. This expression originated in the 1920s in dance-halls as an imperative for dancers to get moving. By 1926 it had been extended to other activities.
See also: dime, get, off

on a dime

In a very small space, suddenly, as in That horse is so well trained it can turn on a dime. This expression alludes to the fact that the dime is the smallest-size U.S. coin. [Early 1900s]
See also: dime, on

stop cold

Also, stop dead or in one's tracks or on a dime . Halt suddenly, come to a standstill, as in When a thread breaks, the machine just stops cold, or He was so surprised to see them in the audience that he stopped dead in the middle of his speech , or The deer saw the hunter and stopped in its tracks, or An excellent skateboarder, she could stop on a dime. The first term uses cold in the sense "suddenly and completely," a usage dating from the late 1800s. The first variant was first recorded in 1789 and probably was derived from the slightly older, and still current, come to a dead stop, with the same meaning. The second variant uses in one's tracks in the sense of "on the spot" or "where one is at the moment"; it was first recorded in 1824. The third variant alludes to the dime or ten-cent piece, the smallest-size coin.
See also: cold, stop

a dime a dozen

AMERICAN
If things or people are a dime a dozen, there are a lot of them, and so they are not especially valuable or interesting. Note: A dime is an American coin worth ten cents. Writers are a dime a dozen, a new one will be easy enough to find. Films about primitive people are a dime a dozen right now. Note: The usual British expression is two a penny.
See also: dime, dozen

turn on a dime

AMERICAN
If something or someone turns on a dime, they suddenly change completely or do something completely different from what they were doing before. Note: A dime is an American coin worth ten cents. Employers need to be flexible and to turn on a dime in order to stay competitive. Note: If something happens on a dime, it happens suddenly, in complete contrast to what was happening before. Outdoors I heard the rain stop on a dime. Note: The idea is of being able to change direction quickly and easily in a very small space, as if your foot were on a coin.
See also: dime, on, turn

nickel and dime

AMERICAN
1. If you describe something as nickel and dime, you mean that it is not important or serious, or involves only small amounts of money. Note: A nickel is a five cent coin and a dime is a ten cent coin. I want to keep the campaign on the issues that matter. I'm not interested in that nickel and dime stuff. Some claim the company's nickel-and-dime charges are driving away sellers of inexpensive items. Note: You can also say nickel-dime with the same meaning. It's nickel-dime stuff, though, compared to what you and Michael have to deal with.
2. If someone nickels and dimes someone or something, they harm them by continually taking small amounts of money away from them, or by continually making small changes or requests. Note: A nickel is a five cent coin and a dime is a ten cent coin. The claims aren't huge but there are a lot of them and it all adds up. We're getting nickeled and dimed to death.
See also: and, dime, nickel

dime store

n. an establishment that is chaotic because of its small scale. I can’t stand this dime store anymore. This is no way to run a law firm.
See also: dime, store

dime-dropper

n. an informer. (see also drop a dime.) I think that Taylor is the dime-dropper who caused the roust.

drop a dime

tv. to inform the police of criminal activity. (Underworld. See explanation at dime-dropper.) No, almost anybody will drop a dime these days.
See also: dime, drop

get off the dime

in. [for something or someone] to start moving. (To get off the dime that one stopped on in stop on a dime.) If this project gets off the dime, we’ll be okay.
See also: dime, get, off

nickel and dime someone (to death)

tv. to make numerous small monetary charges that add up to a substantial sum. Just give me the whole bill at one time. Don’t nickel and dime me for days on end.
See also: and, death, dime, nickel

nickel and dime someone

verb
See also: and, dime, nickel

stop on a dime

in. to stop immediately. Imagine a bus that could stop on a dime.
See also: dime, on, stop

thin dime

n. a dime, thought of as a very small amount of money. (A concept eroded by inflation.) For only one thin dime you will receive our exciting catalog of novelties and tricks.
See also: dime, thin

turn on a dime

in. to turn sharply; to turn in a small radius. A car that will turn on a dime at high speed without turning turtle is what I want.
See also: dime, on, turn

a dime a dozen

Overly abundant; commonplace.
See also: dime, dozen

on a dime

At a precise point; within a narrowly defined area: a sports car that stops on a dime.
See also: dime, on

drop a dime

Slang
To make a telephone call, especially to the police to inform on or betray someone.
See also: dime, drop

drop a dime

To snitch, to betray. Once upon a time, pay phones in enclosed booths could be found on most urban streets as well as in other public areas. Vandalism was rare, so the phones worked, and equally surprising to us today, local calls cost a dime. A person who wanted to report something to the authorities that he or she didn't want anyone to overhear and didn't want the call traced located a secluded phone booth and deposited ten cents. That's the dime that was dropped down the coin slot. The dime-dropper took a big chance, because if the droppee found out, the rat stood a good chance of being exterminated.
See also: dime, drop

get off the dime

To move or to stop wasting time. Back in the 1920s and '30s, taxi dancers were female dance hall employees whose livelihood was dancing with any men who paid for the opportunity. The usual fee was ten cents, but that's not what “dime” in “get off the dime” meant. Dancing with man after man for hours on end was tiring business, and the women often draped themselves over their partners and moved their feet as little as possible, no more than the width of a dime. Although the men didn't object, dance hall managers did. That sort of mobility might lead to hankypanky that would invite attention from the police and other enforcers of public morality. “Get off the dime” was the order, whereupon the women were then obliged to take more energetic dance steps.
See also: dime, get, off