current

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Related to Currents: Ocean currents

swim with the current

To go along or agree with the prevailing or popularly held opinion or perspective; to act or behave the same way as the majority of others. When I was in college, I used to have a lot of radical opinions and beliefs, but as I've grown older, I find myself swimming with the current more often. I'm sorry, but I simply refuse to swim along with the current just because it's the easier option!
See also: current, swim

against the current

In contradiction to what is popular or expected. It was difficult to go against the current, but, in the end, I was able to get the team to agree that my proposal is a good idea.
See also: current

swim against the current

To go against or disagree with a prevailing or popularly held opinion or perspective; to act or behave contrary to the majority of others. I really swam against the current when I was in college with some radical opinions, but as I've grown older I've found myself falling more in line with others. I don't understand why you always have to swim against the current instead of making things a little easier on yourself!
See also: current, swim

swim against the tide

To go against or disagree with a prevailing or popularly held opinion or perspective; to act or behave contrary to the majority of others. I really swam against the tide when I was in college with some radical opinions, but as I've grown older I've found myself falling more in line with others. I don't understand why you always have to swim against the tide instead of making things a little easier on yourself!
See also: swim, tide

pass current

1. obsolete Of a coin, to have a particular monetary worth. The coin passed current for 21 shillings until the end of the 17th century.
2. near-obsolete To be considered genuine or authentic. What passes current as orthodox religious views these days would be considered quite liberal—downright blasphemous, even—two hundred years ago.
See also: current, pass

swim against the tide

 and swim against the current 
1. Lit. to swim in a direction opposite to the flow of the water. She became exhausted, swimming against the tide. If you really want strenuous exercise, go out in the stream and swim against the current.
2. Fig. to do something that is in opposition to the general movement of things. Why can't you cooperate? Do you always have to swim against the tide? You always seem to waste your energy swimming against the current.
See also: swim, tide

swim against the current

Also, swim against the stream or tide . Go against prevailing opinion or thought, as in I'm voting for him even if that is swimming against the current. Shakespeare used a similar metaphor in 2 Henry IV (5:2): "You must now speak Sir John Falstaff fair, which swims against your stream." For the antonym, see swim with the tide.
See also: current, swim

swim against the tide

If you swim against the tide, you do or say the opposite of what most other people are doing or saying. Sinclair seems to be swimming against the tide by not retiring at 60. Thank you for having the courage to swim against the tide and stand up for the qualities that built this great country. Note: You can also say that someone swims with the tide to mean that they act in the same way as most other people. Many great cathedrals are attempting to swim with the tide and bring in tourists to replace the worshippers who no longer come.
See also: swim, tide

pass current

be generally accepted as true or genuine. British
Pass current originally referred to the currency of a genuine coin, as opposed to a counterfeit one.
See also: current, pass
References in classic literature ?
However, I worked hard till, indeed, my strength was almost exhausted, and kept my boat as much to the northward, that is, towards the side of the current which the eddy lay on, as possibly I could; when about noon, as the sun passed the meridian, I thought I felt a little breeze of wind in my face, springing up from SSE.
Just as I had set my mast and sail, and the boat began to stretch away, I saw even by the clearness of the water some alteration of the current was near; for where the current was so strong the water was foul; but perceiving the water clear, I found the current abate; and presently I found to the east, at about half a mile, a breach of the sea upon some rocks: these rocks I found caused the current to part again, and as the main stress of it ran away more southerly, leaving the rocks to the north-east, so the other returned by the repulse of the rocks, and made a strong eddy, which ran back again to the north-west, with a very sharp stream.
The wind freshened, and the Pyrenees, despite the foulness of her bottom, won half a dozen miles away from the westerly current.
This bit of a blow kicked that westerly current ahead faster than you imagine.
If the fish can hold out until the current changes again, we'll be all right.
In spite of these pauses they were really making good progress toward the Winkie Country and having found a way to conquer the adverse current their spirits rose considerably.
It was not till she had passed on nearly to Tofton that she could get the boat clear of the current.
The boat was soon in the current of the river again, and soon they would be at Tofton.
In a moment more, Jane realized, she would be swept beyond the steamer, and then, unless they lowered a boat to rescue her, she would be carried far out to sea by the current and the swift ebb tide that was running.
Heroically she clung to the heavy iron links, almost dragged from the canoe by the strain of the current upon her craft.
He said the first towhead stood for a man that would try to do us some good, but the current was another man that would get us away from him.
As I lay there beneath the dark rocks I noticed that a strong current seemed to flow directly toward the center of the river, so that it was difficult to hold my craft in its position.
They floated along with the current throughout the night, taking turns to watch and steer.
After pursuing a swift but placid course for twenty miles, the current began to foam and brawl, and assume the wild and broken character common to the streams west of the Rocky Mountains.
The current swept me out into the mid-stream, and greatly increased the speed at which I swam.