conviction

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have the courage of (one's) convictions

To have the confidence to act or behave in accordance with one's beliefs or ideologies, especially in the face of resistance, criticism, or persecution. The governor was presented with a bribe to help the corporation avoid regulation, but she had the courage of her conviction to refuse such an offer.
See also: conviction, courage, have, of

courage of (one's) convictions

Strong faith or confidence in one's beliefs. Often used in the phrase "have the courage of one's convictions." I need to have the courage of my convictions any time I'm around my parents—they always try to dissuade me from pursuing a career as a screenwriter. I'm always impressed with Stella—nothing can shake the courage of her convictions in her crusade for social justice.
See also: conviction, courage, of

lack the courage of (one's) convictions

To not have the confidence to act or behave in accordance with one's beliefs or ideologies, especially in the face of resistance, criticism, or persecution. The governor was presented with a bribe to help the corporation avoid regulation, and she accepted it because she lacked the courage of her convictions.
See also: conviction, courage, lack, of

carry (a lot of) weight (with someone or something)

Fig. to be very influential with someone or some group of people. Your argument does not carry a lot of weight with me. The senator's testimony carried a lot of weight with the council.
See also: carry, weight

carry one's (own) weight

 and pull one's (own) weight
Fig. to do one's share; to earn one's keep. (The weight is the burden that is the responsibility of someone.) Tom, you must be more helpful around the house. We each have to carry our own weight. Bill, I'm afraid that you can't work here anymore. You just haven't been carrying your weight.
See also: carry, weight

carry weight (with someone)

Fig. to have influence with someone; [for an explanation] to amount to a good argument to use with someone. That carries a lot of weight with the older folks. What you say carries no weight with me.
See also: carry, weight

have the courage of one's convictions

to have enough courage and determination to carry out one's goals. It's fine to have noble goals in life and to believe in great things. If you don't have the courage of your convictions, you'll never reach your goals. Jane was successful because she had the courage of her convictions.
See also: conviction, courage, have, of

carry weight

Also, carry authority or conviction . Exert influence, authority, or persuasion, as in No matter what the President says, his words always carry weight. Shakespeare combined two of these expressions in Henry VIII (3:2): "Words cannot carry authority so weighty." [c. 1600]
See also: carry, weight

courage of one's convictions, have the

Behave according to one's beliefs. For example, Carl wouldn't give his best friend any of the test answers; he had the courage of his convictions . This expression is believed to have originated as a translation of the French le courage de son opinion ("the courage of his opinion"), dating from the mid-1800s and at first so used. By the late 1800s it had changed to the present form.
See also: courage, have, of

carry weight

COMMON If a person or their opinion carries weight, they are respected and are able to influence people. Not only do men talk more, but what they say often carries more weight. El Tiempo is Colombia's leading newspaper and its opinions carry considerable weight in the country.
See also: carry, weight

carry weight

be influential or important.
See also: carry, weight

have the courage of your convictions

act on your beliefs despite danger or disapproval.
1998 Times The knives were out for us and we had to have the courage of our convictions.
See also: conviction, courage, have, of

carry ˈweight

be important or able to influence somebody: His opinions carry very little weight with his manager.
See also: carry, weight

have/lack the courage of your conˈvictions

be/not be brave enough to do what you believe to be right: You say that cruelty to animals is wrong, so why not have the courage of your convictions and join our campaign?
See also: conviction, courage, have, lack, of

carry weight

verb
See also: carry, weight
References in periodicals archive ?
A fall in speeding offence and common assault convictions drove the overall reduction, the Scottish Government said.
And, staggeringly, the analysis reveals that drink and drug driving convictions in Coventry have increased by 95% in one year alone.
There were 389 convictions for drunkenness with aggravations in 2015/16, or 17 convictions for every 100,000 people in the area.
More than a dozen states allow appeals to continue even after death and only dismiss convictions when the appellate court finds that a new trial would have been warranted," WCVB reported.
There were also 16 convictions outlined on applications for making indecent photographs or pseudo-photographs of a child.
Among previous convictions revealed through the Disclosure and Barring Service for people applying for taxi licences were three rapes.
One conviction was for manslaughter in Wrexham while there were two convictions each for kidnapping in Denbighshire and Wrexham.
Across all local authorities in the Birmingham Mail area, those applying for taxi licences between April 2012 and March 2015 had 520 previous convictions for assault occasioning actual bodily harm, 863 for having no motor insurance, 371 for driving while disqualified and 245 for driving while over the limit.
According to separate data, meanwhile, applications made to Cardiff council for a taxi driver's licence between 2012 and 2015 included two with manslaughter convictions and 155 with assault or assault occasioning actual bodily harm convictions.
UKIP leadership hopeful Steven Woolfe has admitted failing to declare a drink-driving conviction when he stood for a police and crime commissioner post.
After the reforms, that conviction rate differential changed dramatically, with cases in which the victim was a woman now 20 percent more likely to lead to convictions compared to cases in which men were the victims.
Figures obtained from the Ministry of Justice have revealed that between April 2010 and April 2014 there were 424 convictions under the Animal Welfare Act across the country.
In 2007, the new district attorney of Dallas County partnered with the Innocence Project of Texas to review over 400 old cases, many involving denied requests for DNA testing, because the county had the highest number of wrongful convictions in the country.
PAEDOPHILES and dangerous drivers are among those who have applied to be taxi drivers on Teesside, as one in four applications show previous convictions.
And some drivers with previous convictions have been handed licences by councils, it has been revealed.