conclusion

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foregone conclusion

An inevitable result. After how poorly the team has played so far this season, it's a foregone conclusion that they won't make it to the championship.
See also: conclusion, foregone

bring (something) to a successful conclusion

To complete something with a positive or favorable outcome. Although we struggled to finish the presentation on time, we were able to bring it to a successful conclusion.

come to a/the conclusion

1. To make a determination about someone or something. The jury came to the conclusion that the defendant is guilty.
2. To reach an end point. If there are no other issues to discuss, then this meeting can come to a conclusion. That play's lengthy run on Broadway comes to a conclusion tonight.
See also: come, conclusion

in conclusion

In summary; as the final, concluding point. In conclusion, if we do not address this issue now, it will become insurmountable in a few years' time.
See also: conclusion

jump to conclusions

To decide that something is true before one has all the facts. I know you found some suspicious things in her office, but don't jump to conclusions—talk to her first.
See also: conclusion, jump

bring something to a successful conclusion

to complete something successfully. They brought the battle to a successful conclusion. The case was brought to a successful conclusion by the prosecutor.

come to a conclusion

 
1. to reach a decision. We talked for a long time but never came to any conclusion. Can we come to a conclusion today, or do we have to meet again?
2. [for a process] to reach the end and be finished. At last, the yearlong ordeal of buying a house came to a conclusion. I was afraid that the opera would never come to a conclusion.
See also: come, conclusion

foregone conclusion

Cliché a conclusion already reached; an inevitable result. That the company was moving to California was a foregone conclusion. That the mayor will win reelection is a foregone conclusion.
See also: conclusion, foregone

jump to conclusions

 and leap to conclusions
Fig. to judge or decide something without having all the facts; to reach unwarranted conclusions. (See also rush to conclusions.) Now don't jump to conclusions. Wait until you hear what I have to say. Please find out all the facts so you won't leap to conclusions.
See also: conclusion, jump

reach a conclusion

to complete discussion and decide an issue. It took three days of talks to reach a conclusion. When we reach a conclusion, we will notify you of the results.
See also: conclusion, reach

rush to conclusions

to try to reach a conclusion too fast, probably with insufficient evidence; to jump to conclusions. I hope that you don't rush to any conclusions. I can explain this. I'm afraid you are rushing to conclusions when you speak of canceling the performance.
See also: conclusion, rush

foregone conclusion, a

1. An outcome regarded as inevitable, as in The victory was a foregone conclusion.
2. A conclusion formed in advance of argument or consideration, as in The jury was warned to consider all of the evidence and not base their decision on a foregone conclusion . This idiom probably was invented by Shakespeare ( Othello, 3:3) but scholars are not agreed as to his precise meaning. [c. 1600]
See also: foregone

jump to a conclusion

Form an opinion or judgment hastily, as in Wait till you have the facts; don't jump to a conclusion. [c. 1700]
See also: conclusion, jump

jump to conclusions

COMMON If someone jumps to conclusions, they decide too quickly that something is true, when they do not know all the facts. Forgive me. I shouldn't be jumping to conclusions. Note: You can also say that someone jumps to a conclusion. I didn't want her to jump to the conclusion that the divorce was in any way her fault. Note: People sometimes use leap instead of jump. The medical establishment was careful not to leap to conclusions.
See also: conclusion, jump

try conclusions with

engage in a trial of skill or argument with. formal
1902 G. S. Whitmore The Last Maori War in New Zealand Te Kooti 's prestige enormously increased by an apparent unwillingness to try conclusions with him, even with an immensely superior force and in the open plains.
See also: conclusion, try

jump (or leap) to conclusions (or the conclusion that)

form an opinion hastily, before you have learned or considered all the facts.
See also: conclusion, jump

jump/leap to conˈclusions

make a decision about somebody/something too quickly, before you know or have thought about all the facts: There you go again — jumping to conclusions. Wait till you hear my side of the story!
See also: conclusion, jump, leap

a ˌforegone conˈclusion

a result that is certain to happen: It’s a foregone conclusion that Spain will win tonight’s match.
See also: conclusion, foregone
References in classic literature ?
He had shrunk from agitating her on the subject until he could be sure of proving his conclusions to be true.
I can here give only the general conclusions at which I have arrived, with a few facts in illustration, but which, I hope, in most cases will suffice.
In considering the Origin of Species, it is quite conceivable that a naturalist, reflecting on the mutual affinities of organic beings, on their embryological relations, their geographical distribution, geological succession, and other such facts, might come to the conclusion that each species had not been independently created, but had descended, like varieties, from other species.
The process in his mind went on tormenting him without reaching a conclusion.
Now Michael could not reason to this conclusion nor think to this conclusion, in words.
It would have been sheer waste of time--to say nothing of its also implying a want of confidence in my wife--if I had attempted to set things right by disputing Mercy's conclusion.
And that is what I mean when I say that in all states there is the same principle of justice, which is the interest of the government; and as the government must be supposed to have power, the only reasonable conclusion is, that everywhere there is one principle of justice, which is the interest of the stronger.
For if, as you say, justice is the obedience which the subject renders to their commands, in that case, O wisest of men, is there any escape from the conclusion that the weaker are commanded to do, not what is for the interest, but what is for the injury of the stronger?
A friendly conversation in the kitchen, which had a very common, though not very friendly, conclusion.
I did not mean to abuse the cloth; I only said your conclusion was a
a probably premature conclusion upon the doubtful parts of the physiological problem.
With this conclusion we may leave the emotions and pass to the consideration of the will.
Arriving at the conclusion that it certainly was, he turned his back upon the scenes of the past, resolved to amend it in some new sphere of action.
And now, the hand that traces these words, falters, as it approaches the conclusion of its task; and would weave, for a little longer space, the thread of these adventures.
Having sniffed the dead man's lips I detected a slightly sour smell, and I came to the conclusion that he had had poison forced upon him.