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cow college

1. A college or university whose education focuses on agriculture. I always loved working on our farm growing up, so even though I could have gone to business or law school, I always knew I'd be heading to a cow college.
2. Any small, rural college or university, especially one that is relatively unknown or not well regarded. I'm just getting my first two years out of the way at this cow college before applying to a proper university.
See also: college, cow

old college try

a valiant effort. Will made the old college try, but that wasn't enough to get the job done.
See also: college, old, try

cow college

An agricultural college; any small, relatively unknown rural college. For example, He's never published a paper, but he might do all right in some cow college. This term uses cow in the somewhat pejorative sense of "provincial." [c. 1910]
See also: college, cow

old college try, the

One's best effort, as in Come on, if we give it the old college try we just might be able to cut down this tree . This slangy expression, originally a cheer to urge a team on, dates from the 1930s when college football films were very popular.
See also: college, old

Graybar Hotel

and Graystone College
n. a jail; a prison. The two cops had to spend two years in Graybar Hotel with some of the inmates they had caught over the past few years. How long were you at the old Graystone College?

Graystone College

See also: college, Graystone

Joe College

n. a typical or average male college student. Joe College never had a computer or a laser-powered record player in the good old days.
See also: college, joe

Joe College

A typical male college student. The phrase came on the scene in the 1930s, usually applied approvingly, but occasionally as a label for a student whom the academic life sheltered from having to hold down a “real job” in the “real world.”
See also: college, joe
References in classic literature ?
They followed him to a big field back of the college building, where several hundred young Ozites were at their classes.
This college," said Professor Wogglebug, complacently, "is a great success.
Had you a friend in the college, except half-a-dozen toadies, until I came?
Bright himself, he is now in his senior year at Williams College, and has a prospect of graduating with some degree of honorable distinction at the next Commencement.
Hilton Soames, tutor and lecturer at the College of St.
I talked with a boy at Tuskegee who had made such a study as this, and I could not keep from contrasting his knowledge and enthusiasm with what I heard in a class room at a Negro university in one of the Southern cities, which is conducted on the idea that a college course will save the soul.
He would certainly have been reduced to the ranks had not the Director of the College hushed up the whole matter and dismissed the steward.
Further, I had no knowledge of evolution until I was at college, whereas in my childhood and youth I had already lived in my dreams all the details of that other, long-ago life.
In the gray of the morning the two students, pallid and haggard from anxiety and with the terror of their adventure still beating tumultuously in their blood, met at the medical college.
So when he left school they sent him to college, first to Aberdeen and then to Edinburgh.
Besides, I mean to study at home here and take a little college course all by myself.
That is the College of Art and Athletic Perfection," replied Ozma.
The training-authorities at his college, or elsewhere, take him in hand (naturally enough again) on the strength of outward appearances.
I have met with the man for my purpose--an old college friend of mine, now partner in a firm of ship-owners, largely concerned in emigration.
Once, when just from college, and when Horrocks the butler brought him a letter without placing it previously on a tray, he gave that domestic a look, and administered to him a speech so cutting, that Horrocks ever after trembled before him; the whole household bowed to him: Lady Crawley's curl-papers came off earlier when he was at home: Sir Pitt's muddy gaiters disappeared; and if that incorrigible old man still adhered to other old habits, he never fuddled himself with rum-and-water in his son's presence, and only talked to his servants in a very reserved and polite manner; and those persons remarked that Sir Pitt never swore at Lady Crawley while his son was in the room.
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