cancer stick

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Related to Cancer: lung cancer, Cancer treatment

cancer stick

n. a tobacco cigarette. (From the notion that cigarette smoking is a major cause of lung cancer. Old but recurrent.) Kelly pulled out his ninth cancer stick and lit it up.
See also: stick
References in periodicals archive ?
As there are no studies specific to testicular cancer using psychometric assessments, we have turned to the extensive literature on other cancers, most notably breast cancer.
Alongside many breast cancer specific findings, "long delay" (defined as waiting more than 27 days to seek medical help) was associated with the belief that symptoms were not serious, poor health awareness, fear of a cancer diagnosis, and higher levels of psychiatric morbidity.
Death rate declines have occurred in: cervical, ovarian and pancreatic cancer among women; oral, pancreatic, laryngeal and lung cancer among men; and, as a result, benefits in terms of declining lung cancer rates have yet to become apparent.
cancers of the thyroid and melanoma have have increased among men;
For current users, the risk of breast cancer increased with the total duration of hormone use at the start of the study.
The elevated risk of breast cancer in current users of estrogen-only therapy did not vary with the type or dose of hormone, and was the same whether the estrogen was administered orally, transdermally or through implants.
The plumpest people have a higher risk of cancers of the breast, colon, esophagus, kidney and uterus, according to the World Health Organization's international Research on Cancer.
A recent survey, released by the American Cancer Society, revealed a decline in cancer deaths in the United States for the second year in a row.
Researchers have puzzled for years over what they call the "Lance Armstrong effect," named after the world's most famous bicycle racer and testicular cancer survivor.
By simply eating a combination of two natural and delicious foods (found on page 134) not only can cancer be prevented--but in case after case it was actually healed
According to the Nikkei Shimbun, a major economic daily, 111 hospitals in Japan focus on cancer treatment.
Today, millions of Americans proudly display pink ribbons on their cars, women's magazines devote entire sections to breast cancer coverage during October, and breast cancer research receives more government funding than any other cancer.
Too much sun exposure--another lifestyle choice--also is at the top of the list of cancer causes.
In the early 1990s, a number of breast cancer activist organizations began pursuing research into these environmental pollutants as possible avenues to breast cancer prevention (Brown et al.
Harpal Kumar, CEO of CRT, commented, "CRT is pleased to have entered into this partnership with BTG and The Institute of Cancer Research.