enough (something) to choke Caligula's horse

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enough (something) to choke Caligula's horse

A lot of something. The phrase likely mentions Caligula because the Roman emperor was known for his penchant for excess. A: "Do you think I got enough balloons? B: "Are you kidding? There are enough balloons here to choke Caligula's horse!"
See also: choke, enough, horse
References in periodicals archive ?
The violence, the conspiracy and the conflicts with the Patricians form an asphyxiating setting, which, in reality was created by Caligula himself.
Con su Caligula definitivo tambien definio Camus su propia poetica teatral, al concebir la escena como un arte de carne y hueso que otorga a seres vivos la invaluable oportunidad de expresar sus pensamientos y emociones, un arte al mismo tiempo grosero y sutil, con el potencial adiestramiento excepcional de tos movimientos y la voz, de todas las variables y especialidades teatrales.
There is even a rumor that Caligula married Incitatus.
Assim se distinguem tiranos (Julio Cesar, Tiberio, Caligula, Nero, Domiciano, Galba, Vitelio), bons principes (Augusto, Vespasiano, Tito, Otao), ou simplesmente incapazes (Claudio).
The former altar boy was responsible for tarnishing the reputation of Helen Mirren, who went on to play the Queen, by secretly reshooting scenes of her 1979 film Caligula with porn stars.
Elle met en scene Caligula, empereur romain tyrannique qui agit avec demesure, en quete d'impossible.
Speaking of Caligula, my mum, reading TV listings aloud from the paper on Monday, piped up: "Caligula with Mary Berry is on BBC 2 at 9pm.
CALIGULA (9pm BBC2) "THE Rhine, Germany 14AD," reads the opening on-screen caption, just moments before historian Mary Beard drives past in an Opel hire car, somewhat wrecking the ancient vibe.
Caligula With Mary Beard BBC2, 9pm Who's more fearsome, the toga'd tyrant or the academic who took on the Twitter trolls and won?
Prince Caligula of Cambridge has a nice ring to it, as does King Caligula; as does Kong.
Caligula [AD 34-71] is one of those Roman emperors whose fame has spread beyond narrow academic circles.
THE IMAGE OF CALIGULA IN SUETONIUS: REALITY OR CONSTRUCTION
KIERKEGAARD RECALLS somewhere that Caligula wanted to behead all of Rome.
Conspiracies force Caligula to take refuge "in a luxurious brothel," where he loses his life, says the sales synopsis.
In your interview with Gore Vidal, whom I admire greatly, he has the Emperor Tiberius succeeding Caligula.