Cain

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raise Cain

To cause or get into trouble; to engage in unrestrained and excessively disruptive behavior. (A reference to the biblical figure Cain, the first son of Adam and Eve, who killed his brother Abel and was cursed by God.) I started raising Cain as soon as I was in college and could do what I wanted, but I mellowed out after I graduated. The customer has been raising Cain about the service charge we included on his bill.
See also: Cain, raise

the mark of Cain

An association of disgrace or public disapproval over some crime, wrongdoing, personal failing, or controversial action. An allusion to the Biblical figure Cain, the eldest of Adam and Eve's sons, who murdered his brother Abel out of jealousy and was then cursed by God. I wonder is it appropriate that she still bear the mark of Cain for something she did when she was but a teenager. The judge argued that issuing a lengthier sentence would have been a mark of Cain on an otherwise upstanding and motivated student.
See also: Cain, mark, of

raise Cain

to make a lot of trouble; to raise hell. (A Biblical reference, from Genesis 4.) Fred was really raising Cain about the whole matter. Let's stop raising Cain.
See also: Cain, raise

raise Cain

Also, raise hell or the devil . Behave in a rowdy or disruptive way, as in He said he'd raise Cain if they wouldn't give him a refund, or The gang was out to raise hell that night, or The wind raised the devil with our picnic. The first term alludes to the son of Adam and Eve who killed his brother, Abel. It was first recorded in the St. Louis Daily Pennant (May 2, 1840): "Why have we every reason to believe that Adam and Eve were both rowdies? Because ... they both raised Cain.". This statement makes a pun on raise, meaning "bring up" or "nurturing." The two variants, alluding to bringing hell or the devil up to this world, are older, the first from about 1700, the second from about 1800.
See also: Cain, raise

raise Cain

create trouble or a commotion. informal
The sense of raise in this expression is that of summoning a spirit, especially an evil one; similar sayings include raise the Devil and raise hell . A mid 19th-century expression originating in the USA, the particular form raise Cain is possibly a euphemism to avoid using the words Devil or hell . Cain, according to the biblical book of Genesis, was the first murderer.
See also: Cain, raise

the mark of Cain

the stigma of a murderer; a sign of infamy.
According to the book of Genesis, God placed a mark on Cain after the murder of his brother Abel, originally as a sign that he should not be killed or harmed; this was later taken to identify him as a murderer (Genesis 4:15).
See also: Cain, mark, of

raise ˈCain/ˈhell

(informal) complain or protest noisily and angrily, often as a way of getting something you want: He’ll raise hell if we don’t finish on time. ▶ ˈhell-raiser noun a violent and destructive person Cain was the first murderer in the Bible.
See also: Cain, hell, raise

raise Cain

(...ken)
tv. to make a lot of trouble; to raise hell. Fred was really raising Cain about the whole matter.
See also: Cain, raise
References in periodicals archive ?
Readers will remember that Caterer Middle East broke the news about Caines considering an outpost in the UAE capital.
Without it Caines argues he would not be in the right mental state to beat the world's best.
While running restaurants takes most of his time, Caine believes in spreading his risks.
Catherine Caines, John Caines and Andrew Gregory of Payton Jewell Caines
As pressure from the creditors increased, Caines was driven to pretend he had an appointment with Mr Hickman.
But Caines needs no reminding that, after taking apart the best one-lappers at last year's World Indoor Championships, a summer season that promised so much quickly became one of abject despair because of injury.
Speaking to Caterer Middle East ahead of Gourmet Abu Dhabi, Caines, who also was awarded an MBE in 2006 for services to the hospitality industry in the UK, said: "Yeah I'd like to look at the possibilities of setting up a restaurant out here.
Caines, now aged 44, was convicted of the murder of Colin Hickman, aged 55, in March 1994, but has always maintained his innocence.
John Caines, managing director of Payton, Jewell & Caines, which also has offices in Bridgend, Broadlands and Pencoed, was speaking after his colleague Martin Hurry, a respected businessman in the Port Talbot area, confirmed that he is stepping down from his position in order to relocate to Australia.
Financial adviser Tim Caines, from Moseley, Birmingham, was jailed in 1995 for the murder of Coventry solicitor Colin Hickman.
ENGLAND'S Daniel Caines came agonisingly close to adding a bronze in the 400m but just missed out to reigning world champion Avard Moncur of the Bahamas by one hundreth of a second.
Tim Caines, now 43, told the Evening Telegraph he hopes his fight to clear his name will help get "real justice" for Coventry solicitor Colin Hickman, who died after being stabbed 15 times as he opened the door of his home in Earlsdon, Coventry, 10 years ago this week.
Tim Caines, a financial consultant from Moseley, was imprisoned in May 1995 after he was found guilty of stabbing to death 55-year-old solicitor Colin Hickman at his home in Earlsdon, Coventry.